PARENTS

Baby-Dropping, Baby-Selling And A Baby Factory - Has The World Gone Mad?

04/08/2009 09:01 | Updated 22 May 2015

Hundreds of babies were dropped from the roof of a mosque in India last week - supposedly for their own good.

The belief is that the fall will ensure good health and prosperity for their families.

So locals queue up at the Baba Umer Durga shrine to chuck their tots off a 50ft high roof onto a bedsheet.

It's a ritual that's been followed for almost 700 years by Hindus and Muslims in the area.

The video, which you can see here, is quite disturbing but apparently no children were harmed.

Surely it can't be good for their mental health though? It looks terrifying.

Meanwhile, in the USA, Philadelphia police arrested a man who was allegedly trying to sell his baby on the street.

Neighbours told Fox 29 that a 43-year-old man was wandering up and down the road offering his six-month-old daughter for sale for $100.

Fortunately someone called 911 before anybody could take him up on the offer.

The baby was found inside what police called "a known drug house" with an acquaintance of the father. She was taken to hospital where she was said to be in good condition.

Back here in good old Blighty, the tabloids have been reporting that "baby factory" Theresa Winters is expecting another child after her 13 previous kids were all taken into care.

She told the Sun that her and her partner, who live in a one-bedroom flat outside Luton and live off £1,100 worth of benefits a month, are not bad parents. Apparently they improved after the first five kids.

The pregnant mother is now saying she will leave the country to stop social workers taking her 14th child away from her.

The local council reportedly still has grave concerns about potential neglect and the couple's "lack of parenting ability".

These are all pretty disturbing stories but perhaps they will make other parents feel slightly better about their own parenting abilities...

Source: Associated Press

Source: myfoxphilly.com

Source: The Sun

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