Nursery Worker Admits Sex Attacks On Kids

02/10/2009 08:55 | Updated 22 May 2015

Nursery worker Vanessa George has admitted a string of sexual assaults on children as young as 12 months.

This horrible story will send a shiver down the spine of every parent in the land.

For the parents who sent their kids to the Little Teds nursery in Plymouth, there is now an agonising wait to see if their children were among the victims of the paedophile.

George has so far refused to say which children she subjected to the horrific abuse.

The 39-year-old took photographs of the abuse on her mobile phone and swapped them with Colin Blanchard and Angela Allen, who admitted similar charges at Bristol Crown Court yesterday.

The case has raised questions about whether nursery workers should be allowed to use mobile phones at work.

It's also bound to raise the question of how someone was able to get away with this in a busy city nursery.

The three met on Facebook and sent thousands of texts and emails to each other, egging each other on to commit worse and worse acts.

The judge, Mr Justice Royce, told George's lawyers she should reveal which of the children had been involved in the abuse.

He said: "Would it not be decent for her to indicate who she has abused? It is a factor that I have got to take into account."

George hung her head as she admitted seven sexual assaults on children and six counts of distributing and making indecent pictures of children.

Blanchard, from Smallbridge, Greater Manchester, pleaded guilty to 17 child pornography counts and two sexual assaults on children. He also admitted a further charge of possessing extreme pornography. It also emerged he is on the sex offenders register.

Allen, from Nottingham, wept as she pleaded guilty to four child sex assaults and one count of distributing an indecent image.

It's terrifying how much trust we put in the people who look after our children and although there are more and more stringent checks, it's difficult to eliminate the risk altogether.

But we have to ask whether something like this could be prevented in the future. Can you think of any way we can better protect our kids from monsters like this?

Source: AOL News

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