September Baby Boom Expected After Snowed In Couples Get Frisky

26/08/2010 10:02 | Updated 22 May 2015

Health authorities are gearing up for a bumper crop of autumn babies this year, as September heralds the nine month anniversary of the winter snow and blizzards.

Health workers are blaming the Arctic conditions that kept people indoors between December and January for the sudden increase in pregnancies.

Midwives in Portsmouth, Hampshire have said they are expecting to deliver 600 babies in September - a 20 per cent increase on the usual figure.

They put the rise down to the weather conditions at the start of the year which encouraged intimate nights in as couples battened down the hatches against the snow and ice.

Independent midwife Joy Horner said: 'We do see a rise in conception rates when there's been severe weather. The weather has a significant impact and the snow could definitely be the reason for the baby boom next month. If you cannot get out of your house, you've got to find some way to keep yourself occupied.'

The director of nursing at Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Julie Dawes, agreed but added the extra number of expected deliveries would not compromise standards: 'The higher number of mothers due to give birth from September onwards will be an obvious challenge for us due to the extra demand upon our services, but we remain committed to continuing to provide the highest possible standard of care to mothers and their babies in the safest environment.'

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