SATS 'To End' In Two Years After Teachers Strike Deal With Government

28/09/2010 13:23 | Updated 22 May 2015

SATs exams for 11-year-old children could be facing the axe in just two years, after Government ministers reached a deal with headteachers.

The Education Secretary, Michael Gove - who admitted kids were being 'drilled' to pass the exams - has vowed to conduct a sweeping review of the tests. Members of the National Association of Head Teachers welcomed the move, and agreed to call off a planned boycott of the exams in return for seats on the review group.

It is thought that modifications to the exams - and also the controversial league tables system - could now be made as soon as 2012, although further reaching reforms are unlikely to stake place until 2013.

Writing to the NAHT, Mr Gove stated union members had 'articulated many of the most significant criticisms of how the current tests operate'.

He went on to say it was 'clearly undesirable' that the current SATs - which are taken in maths and English by 600,000 pupils in their final year of primary school - 'lead too many schools to drill children for tests, spending too much time on test preparation in Year Six at the expense of productive teaching and learning'.

Mr Gove appeared to suggest he would be open to agreeing to more teacher assessment of pupils, rather than examinations.

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