STYLE

No Link Between Mini-Pill And Heart Risk

18/02/2011 10:43 | Updated 22 May 2015

There have been so many health risks linked to taking the pill, we've almost lost count. For instance experts in the past have suggested there's a link between taking the pill and a higher risk of developing heart disease.

love-hearts-contraception-pillExperts claim the mini-pill doesn't increase heart attack risk. Photo: Corbis

But a new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, claims there's no association between taking the mini-pill and heart attack. So that's one less thing to worry about then.

The Los Angeles-based researchers, from the Women's Heart Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, analysed six previous studies that looked at heart attack risk in women who take progestin-only contraception, including the mini-pill (which doesn't contain the hormone oestrogen) and other types of progestin-only contraception such as implants and injections. And the result, they claim, is there's no evidence that progestin-only contraception is linked with an increased risk of heart attack.

It's good news for the millions of women worldwide who take progestin-only contraceptives. But contraceptives that use both progestin and oestrogen (such as the combined pill) are still more popular, say the experts. That's despite earlier research having found women on the combined pill could have twice the risk of heart attack compared to those not taking it.

The researchers are therefore recommending that women who have an increased risk of heart disease - women with high blood pressure, for instance, or those who are obese or who smoke - may want to consider switching to the mini-pill.

Would you switch to the mini-pill if you thought your heart was at risk?

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