Bond To Blonde: Daniel Craig Dresses In Drag For International Women's Day

08/03/2011 10:43 | Updated 22 May 2015

Daniel Craig has dressed in drag for a short film called Equals to highlight the inequality of women for International Women's Day.

And, although it might be funny to see the manly James Bond star in a blonde wig and heels, underneath the humour is a very serious message: that women are still not equals with men.

The film has a voiceover from Dame Judi Dench, and plays on the Bond theme, with Judi (as her character M), asking Bond if he thinks they are equal.

She highlights the issues women still face in 2011, including unequal salaries; how a man's career prospects are less likely to be affected by having a baby; and the fact men are far less likely to be victims of domestic and sexual assault.

M asks Bond if he has ever put himself in women's shoes, saying: "For someone with such a fondness for women, I wonder if you've ever considered what it means to be one?"

He exits the shot and then reappears dressed as woman, as M reveals some shocking statisitic, including how women complete two thirds of the work in the world yet only earn 10 of the property.

70 million girls do not have access to a basic education and 60 million girls are sexually abused on their way to school.

She also reveals that at least one in four women are victims of domestic violence and every single week in the UK two women are killed by a current or former partner.

The film was directed and written by two of Britain's successful women, Sam Taylor-Wood and Jane Goldman.

Sam Taylor-Wood said: "Despite great advances in women's rights, statistics show that when it comes to the balance of power between the sexes, equality is far from being a global reality.

"As M reminds Bond, facing up to gender issues and the sometimes covert nature of sexism in the 21st century is something that we all have to recognise, confront and challenge."

Do you think women are any closer to being equals with men? Let us know your thoughts below...


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