PARENTS

The Newborn Diaries: Like Mother, Like Daughter

09/03/2011 18:09 | Updated 22 May 2015

Like mother, like daughterI think it's true that one of a mother's proudest moments is seeing her child take after her in some way.

For my own mother, seeing me develop a penchant for overpriced, unnecessary items wasn't a source of despair but rather joy. The moment she discovered how susceptible I was to extravagant purchases was the moment I became unmistakeably hers.

I may be suffering from cabin fever (an unsurprising side effect of spending pretty much 24/7 alone with a baby and demanding dog), so it's no great surprise I've already decided that at the tender age of six months, baby D is becoming a mini-me.

Case in point? This picture. My friend sent me this snap of baby D asleep on her couch the other day.

After admiring how accomplished my daughter's cheeks are - quite a feat that they manage to reach her little tummy! - I had a rush of intense pride.

If a moment in time can encompass what I do best in life, this would be it: I am a rotter, my spiritual home is the couch (in front of the television) and baby D is following suit.

Unfortunately, taking care of a newborn while your husband is at work isn't exactly conducive to a rotting lifestyle, so I guess this photo is also reminiscent of my past life (Sort of like when party girls end up being suburban mums and hang up their high heels for a Cath Kidston apron and country pad, I guess). My 12-hour binge-watching TV while sipping homemade Bloody Mary days may be over for the time being, but given the ease with which baby D slips into the role of mini-rotter, I'm pretty confident she'll be able to do justice to the rotting lifestyle.

This photo is also especially poignant because these moments of perfect stillness seem so infrequent now that Diana is six months old. Diana is now capable of forcing herself to stay awake and too often she seems to find the goings on of her universe too exciting to bother with naps these days.

Perhaps this photo also represents the calm before the storm. In Penelope Leach, I read that we're entering the period that is considered most difficult for new parents, when you cannot leave your child in a room alone for even an instant because of the inumerable dangers that may befall them.

So, things are going to get even harder now? You have to be kidding me.

For more musings on new motherhood, follow me on Twitter @JenBNYC.

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