Explicit Sex Education For Primary School Kids Slammed

10/03/2011 22:58 | Updated 22 May 2015

Children at schoolFurious religious campaigners have branded sex education resources used in primary schools 'explicit' and claim they are inappropriate for children as young as five and six.

The Christian Institute says some learning resources - most of which are recommended by local authorities - contain unsuitable language and information for children.

One book - Where Did I Come From? by Peter Mayle - shows cartoon pictures of naked people along with descriptions of their bodies. The CI says two councils recommend this book for children of seven and over.

Mike Judge, spokesperson for the Christian Institute, told the Press Association: 'Most parents would be deeply upset if these materials were used with their primary-aged child. Parents must have the right to be fully consulted about materials. They must be able to review them, and veto any that are unsuitable.'

The Department for Education's spokesman said in response: 'By law, schools must make sure that sex and relationship education (SRE) classes are appropriate to pupils' ages and maturity.

'It's down to teachers themselves to use their professional judgment in deciding this - and it's common sense to involve parents closely in this. Parents retain the right to pull their children out of any SRE class, outside statutory science, if they are unhappy with teaching.'

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