Wealthy Families Shelling Out For Private Exam Tuition Leaves Poorer Kids Disadvantaged

05/09/2011 11:35 | Updated 22 May 2015


Experts have said that poorer children are missing out on university places because their families cannot afford to splash out on extra tuition to get them through their exams.

A MORI poll of youngsters aged between 11 and 16 in England and Wales found that 25 per cent of more affluent pupils get outside help for A-levels and GCSEs compared to just 15 per cent from less well off families.

Private tutors are most popular in London, and more Asian (42 per cent) and black (38 per cent) families pay for tuition than white parents (20 per cent).

The Sutton Trust charity is funding a year-long scheme to give private lessons to 100 ­disadvantaged students. It's chairman Sir Peter Lampl said: 'Private tuition appears to be booming despite the does give well-off families an advantage.'

Some poorer children currently get home lessons paid for by local authorities, but this is now under threat because of government cuts.

What do you think? Do you agree with extra tuition in the run-up to exams, or do you think all children should be tested on an equal footing and tuition outside of school should be discouraged?


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