Sex In Adolescence Can Stunt Kids' Growth, Claim Researchers

16/11/2011 12:20 | Updated 22 May 2015
Early hanky-panky can stunt kids' growth claims researchPA

If talk about unwanted pregnancy and STIs seems to fall on deaf ears when you try to warn your youngsters about not entering into sexual relationships too soon, try this one: Sex in adolescence will stunt your growth!

Scientists reckon they have found that early sex can affect the immune system and delay the onset of puberty and growth - as well as having "lasting effects on the body and mood" which continue into adulthood.

John Morris, a doctoral student in psychology who conducted the study, said: "Having a sexual experience during this time point, early in life, is not without consequence. It could be affecting males' susceptibility to symptoms of depression and could also expose males to some increase in ­inflammation in adulthood."

It should be noted, however, that Mr Morris and his team carried out their research on HAMSTERS rather than kids... (albeit 40 day old hamsters which they say are equal to early teenagers in human terms...)!

Will you be passing this info onto your kids?

Or just your furry friends?


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