Mark Ronson Reveals Doubts Over Amy Winehouse Album

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Mark Ronson has admitted he initially said no to making a legacy album to Amy Winehouse - because he was still mourning her death.

The music producer, who worked closely with the late songstress on her Back To Black album, was asked to compile tracks for Lioness: Hidden Treasures with Salaam Remi, but turned the opportunity down.

"I said no at first because it felt a little strange and I was still not really coming to terms with losing someone that close to you," he told The Sun.

"Then I heard the vocal (of Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow) and thought it was amazing and that I could do something special with this, which Amy would love. That was when I decided to do it. She sounds incredible."

Winehouse was found dead in bed in her Camden flat in north London on July 23.

The posthumous offering, which is already set to top the album charts upon its release, is a 12-track collection of previously unheard and unreleased alternative versions and new songs.

Ronson confessed making the record had its struggles: "It was hard making this album. Listening to her voice, you forget what happened. You work on it as if she's still alive."

He added: "She was just an incredible singer. She had so much power in that tiny frame. Lioness is an appropriate name for this album because she could just roar at any moment and you would wonder where that force came from."

Amy Winehouse's life in pictures...

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