MPs Will Have Pay Frozen In 2012/13, Ipsa Announce

Posted: Updated:
Print Article
MPs' pay will be frozen next year, parliamentary regulator the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (Ipsa) announced on Wednesday.
MPs' pay will be frozen next year, parliamentary regulator the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (Ipsa) announced on Wednesday.

MPs' pay will be frozen next year, parliamentary regulator the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (Ipsa) announced on Wednesday.

The group's chairman Sir Ian Kennedy said the group were "mindful of the conditions in the rest of the public sector" when recommending the 2012/13 pay freeze.

"We are exploring the broader question of how to reform MPs' remuneration to make it fair to MPs and taxpayers alike and, crucially, how to make it sustainable.

"In the meantime, we must be mindful of the conditions in the rest of the public sector where pay has remained static and where settlements will see most people pay more into their pensions too. While we address the longer-term changes which are needed, I believe it is right that we act in the interim so that MPs' circumstances more closely reflect those experienced by others."

MPs are currently paid £65,738 per year, and receive expenses for office costs and travel.

Ipsa said they were consulting on if pay would rise 1% in 2013 and 2014. George Osborne announced a 1% pay rise for public sector workers in the two years to 2015 in November. The body have been responsible for setting MPs' pay since 2011.

Around the Web

MPs paid thousands to appear on the BBC: As Corporation cuts ...

MPs seem willing to take pay cut

BBC News - MPs agree pay freeze to block 1% pay rise next year

BBC News - MPs asked to vote against 1% pay increase next year

MPs finally agree to give up pay rise after public sector salaries are ...

George Osborne caps public sector pay rises at 1% a year until ...

MPs seem willing to take pay cut

MP's response challenging

Alexander cracks down on public sector pay

Fat Cat Britain: Whitehall mandarins share £100m bonuses