Love classically music, or did you never quite get into it? The London Science Museum has injected a philharmonia orchestra with a jolt of tech, to create a virtual orchestra, the Universe of Sound.

The major new digital installation sees a virtual Philharmonia Orchestra in residence at the Science Museum, allowing visitors to take on the role of musician or conductor. The orchestra will play Gustav Holst’s famous ethereal piece of music, The Planets.

Ian Blatchford, director of the Science Museum, said: "Music conquers all the boundaries between art, science, technology and medicine and this incredibly imaginative project will surprise and delight our audience."

Giant screens, strange sound-projection surfaces, touch screens, movement-based interaction and planetarium-style projection, take the experience of a regular orchestra to a high tech level.

The exhibition aims to help modern music lovers get to grips with the somewhat ailing genre of classical music. Instead of sitting silently in a stuffy performance hall, visitors will be able to drop in to 10 rooms which represent a section of the orchestra.

Using new digital technology, visitors can also join in as a conductor by using conductor simulators and moving their hands in front of screens to control the orchestra on different levels. Some real instruments will be available to play, and visitors will also be able to record their performance which will be posted online.

Richard Slaney, the philharmonia orchestra’s head of digital said: "This project is the perfect fusion of science and the arts. Far from being an elitist artform, there is a colossal public enthusiasm for experiencing classical music, and for stepping inside a real, live orchestra. This project is five times as ambitious, and ten times as exciting. We can’t wait to show people how thrilling a live orchestra really is."

The "orchestra" is in place from 23 May to 8 July 2012 as part of the London 2012 Festival programme.

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