Thousands of people flocked to Bristol this weekend to see a unique outdoor art gallery.

As part of the second See No Evil event, graffiti artists from around the world have been repainting Nelson Street all week.

A total of 40 urban artists, including Mr Jago, Flying Fortress, Nychos and Mark Bode, have used 3,500 spray cans.

All but three of the vibrant images that transformed 22 of Bristol's grey and derelict buildings last summer were painted over in shades of black and grey ahead of the festival.

The event is said to be largest street project in the UK and last year projectors were brought in to help artists create graffiti on buildings up to 10 storeys high.

See No Evil has the support of the Arts Council, London 2012 Festival and Bristol City Council.

Art lovers enjoyed a day-long New York-style block party on Saturday and a family-friendly viewing day today.

See No Evil is part of the London 2012 Festival - a summer-long arts festival throughout the country to celebrate the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

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  • 'See No Evil' street art project (detail) is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • 'See No Evil' street art project (detail) is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • People walk past part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • 'See No Evil' street art project (detail) is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • 'See No Evil' street art project (detail) is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • 'See No Evil' street art project (detail) is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • An artist continues to work on part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • A man walks in front of part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • A artist continues to work on part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • A man photographs part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • 'See No Evil' street art project (detail) is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • People walk in front of part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • An artist continues to work on part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • Artists continue to work on part of the 'See No Evil' street art project at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • Parts of the 'See No Evil' street art project is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • Parts of the 'See No Evil' street art project is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

  • 'See No Evil' street art project (detail) is displayed at Nelson Street on August 17, 2012 in Bristol, England. The project, now in its second year, is Europe's biggest street art festival and has attracted top graffiti artists from all over the world. Organizers hope it will continue to be a draw for tourists visiting Bristol, often seen the spiritual home of underground artist Banksy. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

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