Meet The Superwomen: London 2012 Paralympic Women To Watch (PICTURES)

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WOMEN PARALYMPICS
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With a record-breaking performance from Team GB in London 2012 Olympic Games, we have high hopes for the Paralympics.

Team GB's women secured a total of 10 gold medals and we hope that our Paralympic superwomen will do us just as proud.

With the help of the Women's Sport And Fitness Foundation we've compiled a gallery of women to watch in the Paralympic Games.

From first timer Martine Wright and previous gold medal winner Sophie Christiansen, to youngest female Paralympian Chloe Davis and oldest teammate Kate Murray, they're all here...

Team GB's Female Paralympic Hopefuls
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But hopes do not end with medals and with a record-breaking 1513 female athletes competing, the London 2012 Paralympic Games represents another milestone for women's sport.

WSFF Chief Executive Sue Tibballs said: “Our research has shown that the Olympics inspired 41% of young women to be more active and we hope that the Paralympics will have a similar effect.

"Only 15% of disabled women currently participate in sport or physical activity once a week, so we hope that these Games will inspire thousands more women to get active.”

Many disabled people believe the Games will change attitudes toward disability for the better, according to a recent survey by disability charity Scope.

Speaking to The Huffington Post UK, disability activist and writer Sue Marsh said: "I think there's been so much negativity about disabled people recently - but for the next two weeks Britain is going to be all about disability and that's a fantastic thing. It will change opinions, and hopefully lead to a softening of attitudes."

See also:

'Paralympic Sport Has Power To Change The World'

One-Legged Artist Priscilla Sutton Says Paralympics Will Change Perceptions Of Beauty

Paralympian Athlete Sophia Warner: Mums Should Sometimes Be Selfish

Government Accused Of 'Hypocrisy' Towards Disabled People