As the dust settles on another London Fashion Week, we can't help feeling like we've been a little left out on HuffPost Culture. The past few weeks has seen no place for us by the side of the catwalks, no new trends to coo over or dissect and certainly no glamorous parties to attend. Books and art has little role to play in the exciting world of fashion.

But wait! We can appreciate the art of dressing well, because so many of our literary and artistic heroes didn't just turn out great sentences or paintings, but their wardrobes, as well.

So here we look to those well-dressed creative types who can sometimes get hidden behind their masterpieces. Thanks, guys, for providing endless highbrow fancy dress outfit options. And for ensuring we don't feel entirely left out when sartorial matters are the topic of the day.

Have we missed out your favourite well-dressed creative type? Let us know!

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  • Grayson Perry / Claire

    When Perry won the Turner Prize in 2003, it was difficult to work out whether more column inches went on his provocative pottery, or on his alter-ego Claire - the woman he becomes when he's a transvestite. It may not be your cup of tea, but since Perry admitted to spending <a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2003/nov/21/art.turnerprize2003" target="_hplink">some of his prize funds on outfits for Claire</a>, you've got to admit commitment to the cause. IMAGE: PA

  • Cecil Beaton

    Despite spending most of his time behind the lens, royal and fashion photographer Cecil Beaton cut quite the dash in front of it thanks to his dapper outfits. IMAGE: PA

  • Zadie Smith

    Zadie Smith's postergirl image for Black British writing when her debut novel White Teeth came out was partly influenced by her style - Smith's occasional donning of a turban has become a point of discussion amongst critics of literature and fashion alike. IMAGE: PA

  • Salvador Dali

    Oh hang on, is that a spangled waistcoat we see before us? Oh, yes, yes it is - we shouldn't really be too surprised, it is Dali after all. The surrealist was a fan of capes, fancy moustaches and all sorts of garment eccentricity. Furthermore, he actually designed some bonkers clothes for women too. IMAGE: PA

  • Yayoi Kusama

    Kusama is a polymath of the arts world - writing, creating art and designing fashion, it's hardly surprising she looks like a work of art herself. Her polka-dot obsession stems to everything she wears, which, we gather, is bang on trend this season. IMAGE: PA

  • Hunter S. Thompson

    The only man to work a short-sleeved shirt, a cravat and aviators all at the same time. IMAGE: PA

  • Barbara Cartland

    Like a fine wine, Barbara Cartland has, in our eyes, got better with age. Certainly where her dress sense is concerned, anyway. Here she is with a load of bling she was about to sell at Sotheby's, citing that real jewellery is impractical. Needless to say, we love her. IMAGE: PA

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Not just a man who knew how to create one of the most dapper men in fictional history (Gatsby), but one who perfected the fancy writer look himself. IMAGE: PA

  • Frida Kahlo

    Just, wow. Even if you weren't a monobrow fan, you'd have to admit that Kahlo makes a pretty good stand for having one. Add in the artist's unique take on traditional Mexican dress, with bright colours, layers and elaborate jewellery, and it's hardly surprising she incorporated her style into so much of her art. IMAGE: REX FEATURES

  • Jack Kerouac

    Yes, we know this is only a picture of Kerouac's face. He did also have a well-attired body, but we felt this profile showcased one of the best hairdos in literary history - a perfect cresting wave of a shiny quiff. Drool. IMAGE: PA

  • Tracey Emin

    For somebody who appears so often in her earlier works without many clothes on, this may not be an obvious choice. But when Emin gets her Westwood on she looks as powerful as her art. IMAGE: PA

  • Tom Wolfe

    For somebody who wrote a novel called The Bonfire Of The Vanities, Wolfe may know a thing or two about the indulgence. Yes, he's remarkably well-dressed, but all we can think about is how he managed to gain such success if he spends that long matching a hatband to a shirt... IMAGE: PA

  • Fran Lebowitz

    American author Lebowitz joins Patti Smith and Annie Hall in the file marked, 'Dressing Successfully Like A Man' which, at some point or other, all women aspire to. Well done, Fran Lebowitz. IMAGE: PA

  • Mark Twain

    Even if Twain wasn't a brilliant writer, and didn't have such excellent head-face-hair-growth, people would still stop and stare at him in the street. Such brilliant whiteness of apparel! Such a dainty dicky-bow! Such masculinity while wearing a technically fairly effeminate get-up! IMAGE: PA

  • Yoko Ono

    Saving the best til last. Ever since Yoko crept onto the scene and ruined the lives of thousands of Beatles fans, she's been a stylish lady. And now, in her seventies, she wears hotpants. We bow down to those strangely-propped, ever-present sunglasses. IMAGE: PA