With the wealth of information available nowadays at the mere click of a button, it's astounding to hear how many sexual health misconceptions are still flying around.

So to mark Sexual Health Awareness week, HuffPost UK Lifestyle have decided it's time to set the record straight. It's important to get these things cleared up.

From toilet seats to HIV, with help from the NHS we've compiled a list of the biggest contraception myths.

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  • TRUE OR FALSE?

    Condoms come in many different sizes

  • TRUE

    Condoms come in a range of sizes. If the condoms you've used were too small or big, look out for different sizes or ask your pharmacist or a doctor or nurse at a sexual health clinic for more information. If you're not sure about the size, try one on alone before you have sex to see how it feels.

  • TRUE OR FALSE?

    You can't catch an STI from a toilet seat

  • TRUE

    You cannot catch an STI from sitting on a toilet seat. Sexually transmitted infections are passed on through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex, and sharing sex toys. The only way to protect against STIs is to use a condom every time you have sex.

  • TRUE OR FALSE?

    You always get symptoms if you have an STI

  • FALSE

    You don't always notice symptoms if you have an STI. Many people don't notice symptoms and most people with chlamydia have no symptoms. You won't always know if you've got an STI and you can't tell by looking if someone has one. Protect yourself by always using a condom. If you're worried, visit your GP or sexual health clinic.

  • TRUE OR FALSE?

    If both partners have HIV you still need condoms

  • TRUE

    You should use a condom. Evidence shows that there may be different strains of HIV. If you and your partner are both diagnosed with HIV it may not be the same strain, so condoms are important to prevent cross-infection and the passing of other sexually transmitted infections.

  • TRUE OF FALSE?

    You should use only one condom at a time

  • TRUE

    Using two condoms at the same time is not safe. It increases friction and can cause one or both of the condoms to tear or break. Condoms are effective only if used correctly so check the instructions that come with the packet. They are the only contraceptive method that protect against sexually transmitted infections as well as pregnancy.

  • TRUE OR FALSE?

    You can get an STI by using sex toys.

  • TRUE

    You can get an STI by using sex toys or other objects, but only if someone with an STI has used them before you. Use a new condom on sex toys or other objects for each person that uses them, to prevent catching or passing on STIs.

  • TRUE OR FALSE?

    Chlamydia can make you infertile.

  • TRUE

    Chlamydia can make you infertile if left untreated, if you're a woman. In men, chlamydia may lead to a painful infection in the testicles and can sometimes reduce fertility. Most people with chlamydia have no symptoms but it's easily treated, so if you're worried ask your GP or sexual health clinic for a test.

  • TRUE OR FALSE?

    You can get an STI from oral sex.

  • TRUE

    You can get an STI from oral sex. For example, herpes can pass from a person's mouth to another's genitals, and there is a risk of passing on chlamydia and gonorrhoea. If there is blood present, this raises the risk of getting HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. Using a condom on the penis and a dam (very soft, thin plastic square) on the female genitals can protect against STIs.

A major awareness campaign We Can’t Go Backwards was launched on 10 September by sexual health charities FPS and Brook.

Together they warn against the “toxic mix” of circumstances combining to create a looming crisis in unplanned pregnancy, abortion and sexual health, unless urgent action is taken.

They argue that with cuts and policy changes, vital services that provide advice and information are diminishing.

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Despite the fact that there are 15 types of contraception readily available for use, the FPA estimate that almost 2 million women in the UK are unhappy with the method they are using. The charity say that almost one third of women aged 18-49 spend a mere five minutes when deciding which method to use.

“We need to further educate women about all of their contraception options and clear up any misconceptions so they can make informed decisions that are right for them," said Dr Diana Mansour, head of Sexual Health Services at Newcastle Hospitals Community Health.

"Women, along with their healthcare providers, should take into account their lifestyles when considering available birth control options."

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  • Myth

    1 in 2 women believe that all types of contraception require you to do something regularly to be effective

  • Fact

    "Some long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) such as the implant or intrauterine contraceptives do not require regular administration in order to be effective." - Dr Diana Mansour, Consultant in Community Gynaecology and Reproductive Health Care and Head of Sexual Health Services, Newcastle Hospitals Community Health

  • Myth

    Almost 1 in 5 women don’t realise they can get pregnant if they miss a pill

  • Fact

    "Missing a pill can significantly impact the risk of becoming pregnant particularly if you have unprotected sex around the time of the hormone free interval. If you do miss a pill, follow the instructions on your packet of pills." - Dr Diana Mansour, Consultant in Community Gynaecology and Reproductive Health Care and Head of Sexual Health Services, Newcastle Hospitals Community Health

  • Myth

    "Around 1 in 4 women believe that long acting reversible contraception (LARCs) are permanent and irreversible contraception solutions."

  • Fact

    "Long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are not permanent forms of contraception and are reversible. For example once an implant, intrauterine device (IUD) or intrauterine system (IUS) is removed, there is no evidence to suggest a delay in the woman's fertility return." - Dr Diana Mansour, Consultant in Community Gynaecology and Reproductive Health Care and Head of Sexual Health Services, Newcastle Hospitals Community Health

  • Myth

    Nearly 1 in 5 women believe that all contraception requires a monthly visit to their Healthcare professional (HCP)

  • Fact

    "That's not the case - for example following the fitting of an intrauterine contraceptive, women should return to their healthcare professional for a check at about 6 weeks and then they don't need to make another appointment until it needs changing." - Dr Diana Mansour, Consultant in Community Gynaecology and Reproductive Health Care and Head of Sexual Health Services, Newcastle Hospitals Community Health

  • Myth

    More than half (58%; 2,451 out of 4,199) of women think that long term contraceptives should not be used if you may suddenly decide you want to try to have a baby.

  • Fact

    "Long acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are not permanent forms of contraception and are reversible. There is no evidence of delay in return of fertility when an implant, intrauterine device (IUD) or intrauterine system (IUS) is removed. There could be a delay of up to one year in the return of fertility after a woman stops having the contraceptive injection." - Dr Diana Mansour, Consultant in Community Gynaecology and Reproductive Health Care and Head of Sexual Health Services, Newcastle Hospitals Community Health

  • Myth

    Almost a third of women (31%; 1,309 out of 4,199) think that contraceptive pills have the highest rate of efficacy when compared to other methods.

  • Fact

    "This is not true. The most effective methods of contraception, based on 'typical-use' are the contraceptive implant, intrauterine contraceptives and male and female sterilisation with less than 1 woman in 100 becoming pregnant using these methods. "'Typical-use' refers to how effective a contraceptive method is for the average person who does not always use the method correctly or consistently. For example, women who use oral contraceptives perfectly will experience almost complete protection against pregnancy. "However, in the real world, some women may forget to take a pill every single day, and pregnancies can and do occur to women who miss one or more pills during a cycle. So, while oral contraceptives have a perfect-use effectiveness rate of over 99%, their typical-use effectiveness is closer to 91%." - Dr Diana Mansour, Consultant in Community Gynaecology and Reproductive Health Care and Head of Sexual Health Services, Newcastle Hospitals Community Health

  • Myth

    Nearly 1 in 5 women think that long term methods all need surgical insertion into the uterus.

  • Fact

    "The intrauterine system (IUS) and intrauterine device (IUD) are inserted into the uterus. Injectable contraceptives are however given by injection either into the large muscle in the bottom or in the upper arm and the contraceptive implant is fitted just under the skin on the inside of the upper arm." - Dr Diana Mansour, Consultant in Community Gynaecology and Reproductive Health Care and Head of Sexual Health Services, Newcastle Hospitals Community Health

The above myths are findings from a global survey commissioned by Growth for Knowledge (on behalf of MSD) among 4,199 women aged 18-35.