Interior images taken inside North Korea’s tallest and most ironically iconic building have been published by a tour agency.

The Ryugyong Hotel, which remains unfinished more than 25 years after construction began, was, the BBC says, “intended to communicate to the world an impression of North Korea’s burgeoning wealth.”

Following a lack of funds after the collapse of the Soviet Union, it is now symbolic for all the wrong reasons.

ryugyong hotel

Not exactly homely: A concrete expanse within the Ryugyong Hotel's lobby

The planned seven revolving restaurants have never moved and nor has anyone admired the sights of Pyongyang from its enormous viewing platform.

Today, the 105-storey, pyramid shaped building boasts a shiny, modern exterior, masking the bare concrete interior.

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But it has been variously dubbed by locals as “The Hotel of Doom” or “The Phantom Hotel” and in 2008 it was labelled by Esquire magazine as “the worst building in the history of mankind”.

According to The Telegraph, the hotel, once intended as a grandiose monument to the country, went from being emblazoned across North Korean stamps, to being airbrushed out of official shots.

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  • In this Monday, Oct. 24, 2011 photo, the sky turns shades of purple over the 105-story Ryugyong Hotel, which remains under construction, as the sun sets over Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • In this Sunday, April 1, 2012 photo, the sun is reflected from the top of the 105-floor Ryugyong Hotel, which remains under construction, in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • In this Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 photo, the 105-storey Ryugyong Hotel stands above others in Pyongyang, North Korea. Throughout the capital, and in cities and towns across the country, construction workers are trying to finish building renovations and major projects as the whole country prepares for celebrations on April 15 to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of North Korean founder Kim Il Sung. (AP Photo/Greg Baker)

  • In this photo taken Monday, April 9, 2012, a new banner which calls on Worker Party delegates to lead the country to a better future is seen near the semi-completed 105 story tall Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea. Workers' Party delegates are scheduled to convene Wednesday, April 11, 2012 for the fourth conference of North Korea's ruling political party, where new leader Kim Jong Un is expected to inherit titles once held by his father, the late Kim Jong Il. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

  • A North Korean woman crosses the street near the semi-completed 105-story Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea, Thursday, April 26, 2012. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

  • In this Sept. 23, 2012 photo released by Koryo Group on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012, the pyramid-shaped, 105-story Ryugyong Hotel stands in Pyongyang, North Korea. A foreign tour agency said the interior of the massive, hotel in the North Korea capital remains unfinished. Beijing-based Koryo Tours got a sneak peek inside the hotel that has been an off-limits construction site and remains a source of fascination for the outside world. (AP Photo/Koryo Group) NO SALES EDITORIAL USE ONLY

  • In this Sept. 23, 2012 photo released by Koryo Group on Wednesday, Sept. 26, the pyramid-shaped 105-story Ryugyong Hotel stands in Pyongyang, North Korea. A foreign tour agency said the interior of the massive, hotel in the North Korea capital remains unfinished. Beijing-based Koryo Tours got a sneak peek inside the hotel that has been an off-limits construction site and remains a source of fascination for the outside world. (AP Photo/Koryo Group) EDITORIAL USE ONLY, NO SALES

  • In this Sept. 23, 2012 photo released by Koryo Group on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012, a visitor, center left, stands on the ground floor of the 105-story Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea. After years of standing unfinished, construction on the exterior of the massive hotel resumed three years ago but the hotel has not yet opened to the public. This photo taken by the Beijing-based Koryo Tours shows that the interior remains unfinished. (AP Photo/Koryo Group) NO SALES, EDITORIAL USE ONLY

  • In this Sept. 23, 2012 photo released by Koryo Group, visitors tour the top floor of the 105-story Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea. After years of standing unfinished, construction on the exterior of the massive hotel resumed three years ago but the hotel has not yet opened to the public. This photo taken by the Beijing-based Koryo Tours shows that the interior remains unfinished. (AP Photo/Koryo Group) NO SALES, EDITORIAL USE ONLY

  • Ryugyong Hotel In Pyongyang, North Korea -

    NORTH KOREA - CIRCA 1900: Ryugyong Hotel in Pyongyang, North Korea - It is s a 330-metre-tall pyramid-shaped building with 3,000 rooms, and was supposed to have 7 revolving restaurants. But...it is not finished since 1992! It would be the world's tallest hotel. Most of the hotels in Pyongyang have revolving restaurants, but as there is no public lights in Pyongyang, there's not much to see from those restaurants. (Photo by Eric LAFFORGUE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

  • Members of the New York Philharmonic orc

    Members of the New York Philharmonic orchestra and journalists aboard a bus drive past the 105 storey Ryugyong hotel which began construction in 1987 but remins incomplete due to a lack of funding in Pyongyang on February 27, 2008. North Korea's state media has praised the performance of the New York Philharmonic at a historic concert in Pyongyang, in a rare tribute to American culture. AFP PHOTO/Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • TO GO WITH NKorea-economy-politics-succe

    TO GO WITH NKorea-economy-politics-succession,FEATURE by Ian Timberlake This photo taken on September 22, 2010 shows the 105-storey Ryugyong hotel under construction looming over the center of Pyongyang. The country is moving towards a transfer of dynastic power after Kim Jong-Un, youngest son of ailing leader Kim Jong-Il, was given senior posts in the ruling communist party at a rare meeting on September 28, 2010 and made a four-star general. The conference -- the biggest political gathering in 30 years -- came as the regime struggles to revive the crumbling command economy. Even the showpiece capital Pyongyang appears to be stuck in time, decades past. AFP PHOTO/Ian TIMBERLAKE (Photo credit should read IAN TIMBERLAKE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A panaoramic image created using multipl

    A panaoramic image created using multiple photos shows a general view of the Pyongyang city skyline featuring the Ryugyong 'pyramid' Hotel (top L) and the Juche tower (centre R) on April 14, 2012. North Korea will mark the 100th birthday of their leader Kim Il-Sung on April 15. AFP PHOTO / Ed Jones (Photo credit should read Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)