Cyber crime is one of the world's most dangerous challenges, Foreign Secretary William Hague will tell a conference in Budapest.

Cyber crime is "one of the greatest global and strategic challenges of our time", he will tell delegates at the Budapest Cyberspace Conference.

He will add that it has never been easier to be attack businesses and governments through the internet.

For instance, Hague will point to basic software available online for as little as £3,000, which supposedly can give access to online banking accounts - as well as 24-hour technical help for criminals.

He will say, according to the BBC:

"It has never been easier to become a cyber criminal. Today, such attacks are crisscrossing the globe from north to south and east to west - in all directions, recognising no borders, with all countries in the firing line."

Hague will also point to a new £2m centre to protect the UK against cybercrime, which he believes is a model other countries should follow.

The foreign secretary will also use his speech to attack countries where access to the internet is turned off during protests or in an effort to restrict the freedom of expression and speech.

In recent weeks Iran and several other countries have either restricted or removed access to Google services such as YouTube and Gmail in response to the short film named 'Innocence of Muslims', which sparked protests around the world.

"Those governments who attempt this are erecting barricades against an unstoppable tide," Hague will say.