UPDATE: Felix Baumgartner has jumped from 23 miles up, and beaten two world records

Last week the weather cruelly thwarted Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner's attempt to skydive from an incredible 23 miles up and break the sound barrier on the way down.

But forecasters have given him the go-ahead for an attempt at 1.30pm UK time on Sunday – and you can watch the event live, right here on Huffington Post UK, courtesy of Red Bull Stratos.

The mission is taking place above New Mexico and will see the 43-year-old ascend to the edge of space in a capsule towed by a massive, 330ft helium balloon.

He will then leap out and hopefully leap into the record books with the highest and fastest freefall descent ever.

fearless felix

Felix pictured inside the capsule shortly before launch-time

The previous record for the highest freefall was set by US military pilot Joe Kittinger on 16 August 1960.

He leapt from a helium-filled balloon from 19 miles up and reached 600mph on the way down.

At about 100,000 feet above sea level, Felix Baumgartner will need to accelerate to about 690mph to match the speed of sound, known as Mach 1. Then, if he continues to accelerate and surpasses the speed of sound, he’ll be “supersonic".

To say that jumping from even higher up and plummeting more rapidly than Kittinger is a risky undertaking would be an understatement.

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Felix Baumgartner soars to Earth on a test jump earlier this year

For starters, Baumgartner, also known as “Fearless Felix”, could go into a spin, haemorrhage his eyes and get a blood clot on his brain – or his blood might “boil” if his suit rips.

The Austrian may also break his neck.

But the jump has been meticulously planned over the past five years.

fearless felix

He’s already made two test jumps from 15 and 18 miles - and he’s using state-of-the-art kit.

For example, if he’s rendered unconscious an emergency parachute will deploy automatically.

fearless felix

Baumgartner has trained rigorously for the jump

Baumgartner explained that he's feeling supremely confident the jump will be successful.

He said: “The reason I believe we’re going to be successful is because we’ve put together an incredible team of experts and we have gone about this in a very carefully planned, scientific way. I didn’t want to go from zero to hero - instead we’ve done lots of tests to progress gradually, step-by-step, toward the final goal. Each test has taught us something.”

“Every test - from wearing the suit in a wind tunnel, to simulations in an altitude chamber, to jumping from airplanes, and then jumping from a balloon in the stratosphere - has been more difficult, and the success of each one has raised our motivation even higher.”

His journey down will be one that no skydiver will be familiar with.

He’ll be so high up that he won’t even have a sensation of falling, because there’s hardly any atmosphere.

fearless felix

Kittinger reported that his jump suit didn’t even ripple during the first few minutes of the fall.

According to Red Bull's calculations, Baumgartner will reach almost 700mph in less than 40 seconds.

Many people will wonder, of course, whether Felix really will be “Fearless” on the big day.

According to Dr Rhonda Cohen, Sport Psychologist at Middlesex University, his moniker isn’t entirely accurate.

She told Huffington Post UK: “People who do extreme things do so because they are able to weigh up the risk and the safety factor. They can calculate the extent of the danger. Will Felix be scared? Of course - the dangers are still there – risk to health and life.

“However, the gamble is that focusing in on the goal of achieving a record will outweigh the possible death. So like a gambler – it’s weighing whether there is a greater chance of success than a risk of death. People in extreme sport examine that balance continuously.”

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Dr Cohen believes that what motivates the daredevil is the challenge of redefining the limits - and simply getting a buzz.

She added: “People in extreme enjoy pushing the limits – it’s that sense of being really frightened but being really excited at the same time. It is the sense of challenge in one hand and the sense of the unknown in the other.”

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  • Felix Baumgartner

    This image provided by Red Bull Stratos shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria sitting in his capsule in preparation for the final manned flight of Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M., Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012. Baumgartner canceled his planned death-defying 23-mile free fall on Tuesday because of high winds, the second time this week he was forced to postpone his quest to be the first supersonic skydiver. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos)

  • Don Day

    Workers in Roswell, N.M., unravel the balloon that will lift Felix Baumgartner to 120,000 feet in his attempt to make a record-breaking skydive from a space capsule attached to the balloon Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. Baumgartner, 43, will attempt to break the speed of sound with his own body in a death-defying 23-mile free fall – an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 – which will deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    Felix Baumgartner, in pressurized suit on platform at left, prepares to enter the balloon capsule in Roswell, N.M. on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. Baumgartner will attempt to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from the space capsule lifted by a 30 million cubic foot helium balloon. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet - an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in freefall - which will deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    Felix Baumgartner, in pressurized suit on platform at left, prepares to enter the balloon capsule in Roswell, N.M. on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 in an attempt to break the speed of sound in a record-setting 23-mile-high jump. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    Felix Baumgartner disembarks from the balloon capsule after his mission was aborted in Roswell, N.M. on Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. Baumgartner was attempting to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from the capsule lifted 23 miles high by a 30 million cubic foot helium balloon. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    The helium balloon is pushed by winds seconds after Felix Baumgartner's 23-mile-high jump was aborted Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner was attempting to break the speed of sound with his own body. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    The helium balloon is pushed by winds seconds after Felix Baumgartner's 23-mile-high jump was aborted Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012 in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner was attempting to break the speed of sound with his own body. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • The ascension capsule is moved behind Mission Control after Felix Baumgartner's 23-mile-high jump was aborted, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Roswell, NM. Baumgartner was attempting to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from the capsule lifted by a 30 million cubic foot helium balloon. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    This image provided by Red Bull Stratos shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria sitting in his capsule in preparation for the final manned flight of Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M., Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012. Extreme athlete and skydiver Baumgartner canceled his planned death-defying 23-mile free fall on Tuesday because of high winds, the second time this week he was forced to postpone his quest to be the first supersonic skydiver. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos)

  • Dawn light begins to show over the balloon capsule in Roswell, N.M., prior to the inflation of the balloon that will lift Felix Baumgartner to an altitude of 120,000 feet, from which he plans to make a record-breaking skydive Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. Baumgartner, 43, will attempt to break the speed of sound with his own body in a death-defying 23-mile free fall – an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 – which will deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Don Day

    The sun rises as weather balloons hover above the launch site in Roswell, N.M., where Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a 30 million cubic foot helium balloon Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet - an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in freefall – which will deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Workers prepare at the launch site, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Roswell, N.M., ahead of an attempt by Felix Baumgartner to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet_an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in freefall_ which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • People walk to Mission Control early Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet_an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in freefall_ which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Workers prepare at the launch site before inflating a balloon, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Roswell, N.M., ahead of an attempt by Felix Baumgartner to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet_an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in freefall_ which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Don Day

    Mission Control meteorologist Don Day discusses the weather conditions Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Roswell, N.M., where Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a 30 million cubic foot helium balloon. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet - an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in freefall – which will deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    FILE - In this Thursday, March 15, 2012 photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Felix Baumgartner prepares to jump during the first manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos over Roswell, N.M. On Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 over New Mexico, Baumgartner will attempt to jump higher and faster in a free fall than anyone ever before and become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Jay Nemeth)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    In this Wednesday, July 25, 2012 photo made available by Red Bull, Felix Baumgartner of Austria uses a parachute to land in the desert near Roswell, N.M. during the second manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos. Baumgartner made his second stratospheric leap Wednesday, this time from more than 18 miles (29 kilometers) above the Earth - nearly three times higher than cruising jetliners. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Jorg Mitter)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    FILE - In this Thursday, March 15, 2012 file photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Felix Baumgartner salutes as he prepares to board a capsule carried by a balloon during the first manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. On Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 over New Mexico, Baumgartner will attempt to jump higher and faster in a free fall than anyone ever before and become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Joerg Mitter)

  • Felix Baumgartner, Joe Kittinger

    FILE - In this Friday Jan. 22, 2010 photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Pilot Felix Baumgartner, left, shakes hands with United States Air Force Col. (Ret.) Joe Kittinger, right, following the Red Bull Stratos press conference in New York announcing Baumgartner's plan to attempt to become the first person ever to break the speed of sound with the human body. On Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 over New Mexico, Baumgartner will attempt to jump higher and faster in a free fall than anyone ever before and become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier. Kittinger launched a stratospheric jump in 1960 from 102,800 feet that opened the door for space exploration and whose records Baumgartner aims to break. (AP Images for Red Bull Stratos, David Goldman)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    FILE - In this Friday Jan. 22, 2010 photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Pilot Felix Baumgartner appears at a news conference in New York. On Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 over New Mexico, Baumgartner will attempt to jump higher and faster in a free fall than anyone ever before and become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos)

  • Felix Baumgartner, Joe Kittinger

    In this photo provided by Red Bull, Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, right, hugs Capcom 1 U.S. Air Force Col. (ret.) Joe Kittinger, after the second manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Wednesday, July 25, 2012. Baumgartner took another stratospheric leap, this time from an altitude of more than 18 miles (29 kilometers) — an estimated 96,640 feet (29,456 meters), nearly three times higher than cruising jetliners. His top speed was an estimated 536 mph (862.5 kph), said Brian Utley, an official observer on site. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Predrag Vuckovic)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    FILE - In this 2010 photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Felix Baumgartner makes a 25,000-foot high test jump for Red Bull Stratos. On Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 over New Mexico, Baumgartner will attempt to jump higher and faster in a free fall than anyone ever before and become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Luke Aikins)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria, sits in his trailer during the preparations for the final manned flight of the Red Bull Stratos mission in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria, sits in his capsule during the preparations for the final manned flight of the Red Bull Stratos mission in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)

  • In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria, stands in his trailer during the preparation for the final manned flight of Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria,sits in his capsule during the preparation for the final manned flight of Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    In this Feb. 23, 2012 photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, pilot Felix Buamgartner of Austria shows a piece of the balloon material during the Red Bull Stratos egress training in Lancaster, Calif. It’s described as a “40-acre dry cleaner bag,” that, when first filled, will stretch 55 stories high. On Monday, this special ultra-thin helium balloon is scheduled to liftoff from Roswell, N.M., to carry "Fearless Felix" Baumgartner 23 miles into the stratosphere for what he hopes will be a history-making, sound barrier-breaking skydive. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Joerg Mitter)

  • In this Nov. 8, 2011, photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, retired U.S Air Force Col. Joe Kittinger, left, and pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria greet each other during the Brooks chamber test for Red Bull Stratos, a mission to the edge of space to break the speed of sound in freefall, in San Antonio. On Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, if winds allow, in the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., pilot Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Christian Pondella)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 16, 1960, file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Col. Joe Kittinger steps off a balloon-supported gondola at an altitude of 102,800 feet. In freefall for 4.5 minutes at speeds up to 614 mph and temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit, he opened his parachute at 18,000 feet. On Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, if winds allow, in the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., pilot Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, File)

  • Felix Baumgartner

    In this March 15, 2012, photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria prepares to jump at the first manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. On Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, if winds allow, in the desert surrounding Roswell, Baumgartner will attempt to break Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Jay Nemeth)