Fans of JRR Tolkien's fiction have gotten used to the idea that the only 'new work' they're going to see from him will be in the form of a Hollywood blockbuster.

But publishers HarperCollins have changed that with the announcement that they plan to publish a never-before-seen poem by the Lord Of The Rings author.

The Fall Of Arthur is a 200-page story about ancient Britain that covers the final days of King Arthur's reign in which the old king tries to defend his country from Mordred the usurper.

It will be the first 'new' release from Tolkien in four years since 2009's The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún and, while it doesn't feature Middle-Earth or any of his most famous characters, The Fall of Arthur should prove and exciting prospect for Tolkien fanatics and scholars.

Chris Smith, the book's editor, said that the poem "breathes new life into one of our greatest heroes... revealing Arthur as a complex, all-too human individual who must rise above the greatest of betrayals to liberate his beloved kingdom".

The Fall Of Arthur will be out next Spring. Are you excited?

Eleven things you didn't know about JRR Tolkien...

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  • It was when he was working as an academic at Oxford that Tolkien wrote <em>The Hobbit </em>and the first two volumes of <em>The Lord of the Rings</em>. A blue plaque was placed on his house in North Oxford in 2002. PICTURE: Wikimedia

  • In 2008, The Times ranked Tolkien sixth on a list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945".

  • Together with his close friend C.S. Lewis, author of The Chronicles of Narnia, Tolkien was a member of The Inklings, an literary discussion group at Oxford University that met in a The Eagle and Child pub and encouraged fantasy writing. PICTURE: Wikimedia

  • As a small boy, Tolkien was bitten by a large baboon spider in the garden, an event which some commentators think had later echoes in his stories. PICTURE: Wikimedia

  • Tolkien was a devoted father and would write his four children illustrated letters from Father Christmas when they were little, full of drawings of goblins and elves. PICTURE: PA

  • When his wife died Tolkien had her gravestone engraved with the name 'Lúthien' and when he died nearly two years later he included 'Beren' alongside his own name, after two lovers who feature in his myth of Middle-earth, <em>The Silmarillion</em>. PICTURE: Wikimedia

  • His first civilian job was working for the Oxford English Dictionary, where he worked mainly on Germanic words. PICTURE: Wikimedia

  • When Tolkien was working as a signals officer during the First World War, he and his wife Edith developed a special code so that she could track his movements on a map of the Western Front. PICTURE: PA

  • Today there is a professorship in Tolkien's name at Oxford, the J.R.R. Tolkien Professor of English Literature and Language. PICTURE: Wikimedia

  • Tolkien worried about the being too popular with the Nazis, who liked his celebration of Germanic themes and language. When a German publisher asked him to confirm his Aryan origin, he wrote them a furious letter, objecting to the Nazi "race-doctrine". PICTURE: Wikimedia

  • When Tolkien was working as a signals officer during the First World War, he and his wife Edith developed a special code so that she could track his movements on a map of the Western Front. PICTURE: Wikimedia