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Bad Sex Award Book Nominations Announced: Who Do You Think Should Win? (VOTE)

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In a year in which an entire novel of badly-written sex scenes became the biggest selling British novel of all time, there must have been a fear that the annual Bad Sex Awards might feel a little redundant.

But the judges of the most dreaded prize in literature have stuck to business as usual, ignoring 50 Shades Of Grey and opting for 8 novels concealing bedroom secrets that are, in their own way, far more cringe-worthy than EL James's efforts (and a whole lot funnier).

SCROLL DOWN FOR EXTRACTS + VOTE

Notable names on the shortlist include Paul Mason, the economic editor of Newsnight whose nomination for debut novel Rare Earth may admittedly be the least of his professional concerns right now.

Also accused of producing an egregious sex scene is Nicola Barker, who is nominated for The Yips - despite the novel being long listed for the Booker this year.

One high-profile omission from the list is JK Rowling's The Casual Vacancy which the Literary Review admits to receiving "floods of recommendations" for. Despite the headlines her nomination would have generated, the judges decided Rowling first stab at 'adult material' wasn't as bad as the others.

Last year the prize was won by David Guterson for Ed King, who was presented with his award by Barbara Windsor. The 2012 winner will be announced at a lavish ceremony at the Naval & Military Club in London.

The purpose of the prize is to draw attention to the crude, badly written, often perfunctory use of redundant passages of sexual description in the modern novel - and to discourage it.

Here are some short extracts from the short-listed novels. Vote for who you think should win below.

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Think this lot are bed? Check out our round up of the worst sex scenes ever...

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