It's official. The world's most unhealthy Christmas dinner* may have been found in a fish and chip shop in the West Midlands.

Hollywood Fish Bar in Birmingham has created a deep-fried Christmas dinner complete with all the trimmings (see video above).

Speaking to The Telegraph, restaurant owner Chris Christoforou explains that the Fish Bar will not be serving the aforementioned Christmas dinner to customers (shame).

But, do not fear, they will be offering the Santa's Sandwich, a miniature version of this nutritious meal, served on a bun.

He explains: "To create the Santa's Sandwich we start by toasting the floured bun and basting it with cranberry sauce, turkey breast on top of the cranberry and then a sausage topped with the stuffing and then hot gravy on top."

Chris explains that his customers tend to be apprehensive about the snack at first, but many are pleasantly surprised once they try it and even come back for seconds.

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With the average unbattered Christmas dinner clocking up more than 3,500 calories -- yes, we were shocked too -- sex toy website Desire and Pleasure have worked out that it will take 11.5 hours of sex on Boxing day to burn it off again. Ahem.

Although that might sound like a whole lot of festive fun, HuffPost UK Lifestyle dread to think how long it would take to burn a battered Christmas meal off.

This deep-fried meal isn't the first extreme Christmas dinner to knock the stuffing out of HuffPost UK Lifestyle and, regrettably, we fear it won't be the last.

Behold Christmas Dinner In A Can, a self-heating Yuletide meal complete with "hot and steamy" turkey casserole.

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Mmm...looks delicious

It's available to buy via Firebox and was described by HuffPost UK's Tech editor, Michael Rundle, as the "saddest gadget ever made".

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If you had to eat one, which Christmas meal would you prefer?

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*Note: This fact has yet to be verified. HuffPost UK Lifestyle are investigating.

Also on HuffPost UK Lifestyle:

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  • It Takes 295 Days To Grow...

    How long does it take to make your Christmas dinner? Two hours? Maybe four? In fact, the average Christmas dinner takes 295 days to make before it reaches our plate according to research by <a href="http://www.morrisons.co.uk/" target="_hplink"><em>Morrisons</em></a>, as it needs 10 months to sow and grow before it's ready for the festive feast. However, while it takes our beloved seasonal veg and turkey months to grow - it takes us Brits just over half an hour to polish the lot off. <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2011/12/06/our-christmas-dinner-takes-10-months-to-grow_n_1131850.html" target="_hplink"> <strong>Find out how long it takes all of the Christmas vegetables to grow</strong></a>.

  • It Takes 47 Years To Perfect

    According to a study by the <em><a href="http://www.foodnetwork.co.uk/" target="_hplink">Food Network UK</a></em>, cooking Christmas dinner is so tricky, it takes us 47 years to perfect it without any mishaps. The study found that a third of women never manage to cook the festive meal without a drama, with one in ten admitting that they mess up the gravy every year and 9% even forget to defrost the turkey. "There is a lot of pressure to pull off the 'perfect' dinner and in many families, you have to live up to the standards set by your mother or mother-in-law, who have been mastering their festive feast for years," says Nick Thorogood from the study.

  • It'll Make You Gain 7lbs...

    The average Brit will gain up to half a stone over the festive period, as the temptation of never-ending chocolates, mince pies and savoury snacks get the better of them, according to research by the <a href="http://www.bda.uk.com/" target="_hplink">British Dietetic Association</a>. With the average Christmas dinner racking up 956 calories and containing 48g of fat, it's little wonder that we see the festive pounds pack on and suffer from <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2011/12/16/how-to-fight-the-festive-fatigue-this-christmas_n_1153536.html?ref=uk-lifestyle" target="_hplink">festive fatigue</a> shortly after the day of indulgence. <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12/05/health-track-your-alcohol-calorie-intake_n_2243127.html" target="_hplink"><strong>Find out how you can avoid the Christmas fat-trap and minimise your calories</strong></a>.

  • Hatred Of Brussels Sprouts Is Genetic

    If you despise brussels sprouts, you're not being a fussy eater because according to scientists from <em><a href="http://www.loreal.com/_en/_ww/research-l-oreal.aspx" target="_hplink">L'Oréal Research Centre</a></em>, some of us were born to hate the festive brussels. The gene, carried by 70% of us, make the brain detect sharp, bitter flavours and that's what makes us shun the green veg when eating our Christmas dinner. Researchers also found that our modern eating habits have blunted the gene with our taste for booze, cigarettes and spicy foods like curry.

  • It Doesn't Have To Cost More Than £2...

    Forget all the turkey trimmings - if you're feeling the pinch this Christmas, you can feed your friends and family on Christmas Day for under a fiver. Well, £2 to be exact. Money-saving site, <em><a href="http://www.studentbeans.com/" target="_hplink">Studentbeans</a></em> have come up with an <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2011/12/14/christmas-dinner-that-costs-2-takes-10-minutes_n_1147861.html?ref=uk-lifestyle" target="_hplink">alternative dinner that costs just £2 per head.</a> <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2011/12/14/christmas-dinner-that-costs-2-takes-10-minutes_n_1147861.html?ref=uk-lifestyle" target="_hplink"> <strong>Find out what ingredients you'll need to rustle up the £2 Christmas dinner</strong></a>

  • It Has Nearly Twice The RDA Of Salt

    Britons eat nearly twice their recommended salt allowance on Christmas Day, health campaigners from<a href="http://www.actiononsalt.org.uk/" target="_hplink"> <em>Consensus Action of Salt and Health</em></a> (CASH) have warned. The salt RDA is 5g, but the average Christmas dinner contains 8.87g of salt. While the nation goes about their routine gorge on the big day, experts warn that hungry Brits should steer clear of salt traps like processed and pre-prepared food to reduce the salt intake this Christmas.