Technology is a business like many others - which means it has a problem with sexism.

And while progress has been made by committed opponents, after yet another controversy in the world of video games this week, and a CES in which so-called 'booth babes' and sexist adverts were still a feature, it's clearly still an issue.

As these examples seem to prove, sexism is nothing new in technology. But that doesn't mean the problem doesn't exist - and isn't worth fighting against.

Take a look below, then answer our poll - do you think tech has a problem with sexism?

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  • Voco

    This advert for the voice-control company Voco <a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/10/voco-s-sexist-ad-points-up-that-the-tech-industry-badly-needs-women.html">was widely attacked</a> after it was sent out before CES 2013 in Las Vegas. Jennifer Siebel Newsom and Jean Kilbourne at the Daily Beast said: "The objectification of women and girls in advertising is a serious problem. It encourages men to see women as a collection of body parts rather than whole people."

  • Voco Ad

    This advertisement for the voice-control company Voco <a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/10/voco-s-sexist-ad-points-up-that-the-tech-industry-badly-needs-women.html">was widely attacked</a> when it was sent out before CES 2013 in Las Vegas. Jennifer Siebel Newsom and Jean Kilbourne at <a href="http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/10/voco-s-sexist-ad-points-up-that-the-tech-industry-badly-needs-women.html">the Daily Beast said</a>: "The objectification of women and girls in advertising is a serious problem. It encourages men to see women as a collection of body parts rather than whole people."

  • CES 2013 'Booth Babes'

    This notorious picture was taken at CES 2013 <a href="https://twitter.com/Emily?tw_i=289528100293849088&tw_e=screenname&tw_p=tweetembed">by Emily Price</a>. It depicted a company's booth where women were paid to stand mostly naked to attract attention.

  • Toshiba 'Excite' Ad

    This ad for the Toshiba 'Excite' tablet was released in 2012. It was apparently supposed to be funny, but instead angered many in the tech industry.

  • Droid Ad

    The original Droid by Verizon was advertised by focusing on its aggressive, "hardcore" technology -- and by comparing it to the "princess" iPhone, illustrated with a handy woman. It was accused of being sexist.

  • Droid Bionic Ad

    To combat that perception, Verizon made an ad for the follow-up Droid Bionic, which was eventually pulled after it was decried as demeaning instead of empowering.

  • Microsoft Ad

    This ad was pulled by Microsoft the day after it was released in Switzerland. A spokesperson said ads there were made with "local interest and local culture in mind".

  • Dead Island 'Zombie Bait' Game

    This special edition video game was announced in 2013 -- and was supposed to come with a dismembered, headless statue of a woman wearing a bikini. After an uproar, publishers Deep Silver swiftly apologized.

  • Samsung SMART Cameras Launch

    Amy Childs launched the new range of Samsung SMART cameras in 2012 by standing under an advertisement that claimed the cameras were "Too Smart For Amy." Needless to say, it wasn't taken particularly well after people pointed out that it might imply women as a whole, rather than this specific woman, were too dumb to use their camera.

  • Historical Ads

    Of course, sexism in tech is nothing new -- this ad by Pitney-Bowes from the 1960s asks if it's illegal to kill a woman because she doesn't want to use a new-fangled postage meter. It is.

  • Compaq iPaq Ad

    This French ad for Compaq's iPaq organizer was released in 2001. The copy translates as "iPAQ Pocket PC. All the functions of a PC plus others you'll discover along the way." GraceNet decried it as "flagrantly sexist."

  • PS Vita Ad

    This ad was produced for Sony to promote its dual-sided PS Vita handheld, with the tag line "Touch both sides. Twice the sensations." Sony <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/11/05/playstation-vita-advert-sexist-controversial_n_2075412.html">told HuffPost</a>: "It is part of a catalogue distributed at the Paris Games Week and was therefore intended for gamers at the event."

  • Godaddy

    Web hosts Godaddy <a href="http://breakupwithgodaddy.com/">have been frequently accused of crossing the line between controversial and sexist</a> in their advertising campaigns.

  • Viewtronicx Booth

    Booth babes at tech trade shows are a frequent sight - though most are just a little less egregious than this CES 2012 picture taken at the Viewtronicx booth.