Prime minister David Cameron discussed the financial crisis in Cyprus with Russian President Vladimir Putin in a phone call on Friday morning.

The call came as authorities on the Mediterranean island sought to convince international lenders to provide the money Cyprus needs to avoid bankruptcy within days.

putin cameron

David Cameron greets Vladimir Putin on a visit to Downing Street in 2012

Cypriot efforts to clinch a contribution from Moscow appear to have failed after Russia's finance minister was quoted as saying talks had broken down. The Kremlin has a significant interest in the situation, because Russian depositors are believed to have around £17 billion in Cypriot banks.

Downing Street said that Cameron and Putin "agreed that they hoped a solution could be found to the crisis", but added that Cyprus took up only a small part of the 30-minute call, which also touched on Syria, the upcoming G8 and G20 summits in Northern Ireland and St Petersburg and BP's Arctic oil deal with Russian company Rosneft.

Cypriot MPs are discussing plans to restructure the country's second largest lender, Laiki bank, as part of a plan to raise up to €5.8b (£4.9bn) to secure a larger rescue package of another €10bn (£8.5bn) from the other 16 eurozone nations and the International Monetary Fund.

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A new package is necessary after the parliament in Nicosia rejected a plan this week to grab up to 10% of bank deposits. Banks have remained closed for fear of queues of depositors withdrawing their savings.

The UK government has said it will guarantee the savings of British Armed Forces personnel and civil servants posted to the island, and on Tuesday an RAF plane carried one million euros (£850,000) to Cyprus as a "contingency measure" for troops and their families in case cash machines stop working.

Asked on Friday whether any help was being considered for other British nationals, a Downing Street spokesman said: "Obviously we understand that developments in Cyprus will be worrying for British nationals with savings in Cyprus. We would encourage British nationals who are experiencing difficulties to contact their bank."

Anyone planning a holiday in Cyprus over Easter should keep in touch with Foreign Office advice, which is being kept under review, said the spokesman.

After updated advice yesterday, the Foreign Office website does not caution against travel to Cyprus, but warns: "Cyprus is implementing measures to protect its banking sector. Check with your bank for further information.

"The government of Cyprus has announced an extended bank closure. ATMs, debit and credit cards can be used as normal; however, while banks are closed, we advise taking sufficient euros to cover the duration of your stay, alongside appropriate security precautions against theft."

The Downing Street spokesman said the UK regards the situation in Cyprus as "essentially a matter for the eurozone".

He added: "The situation in Cyprus remains fluid, but it is in all of our interests that Cyprus tackles its difficulties and its banks are stable.

"We will keep the situation under review."

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  • Protesters shout slogans during a protest outside of the parliament in Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. A vote on a bailout package for Cyprus that includes an immediate tax on all savings accounts has been postponed until Tuesday evening. Yiannakis Omirou, the speaker of Parliament, said the delay was needed to give the government time to amend the deal reached over the weekend that prompted an outcry from those who thought their money was safe. In order to get euro 10 billion ($13 billion) in bailout loans from international creditors, Cyprus agreed to take a percentage of all deposits — including ordinary citizens' savings — an unprecedented step in Europe's 3 ½-year debt crisis. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • A protestor holds out her hand during a protest outside the parliament in Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. A vote on a bailout package for Cyprus that includes an immediate tax on all savings accounts has been postponed until Tuesday evening. Yiannakis Omirou, the speaker of Parliament, said the delay was needed to give the government time to amend the deal reached over the weekend that prompted an outcry from those who thought their money was safe. In order to get euro 10 billion ($13 billion) in bailout loans from international creditors, Cyprus agreed to take a percentage of all deposits — including ordinary citizens' savings — an unprecedented step in Europe's 3 ½-year debt crisis. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • CYPRUS-ECONOMY-EU-FINANCE

    Cypriots walk past a papier-maché statue caricaturing German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President of Cyprus Nikos Anastasiadis, in an annual carnival in the southern city of Limassol. Cyprus postponed an emergency debate in parliament on a controversial EU bailout, threatening a prolonged closure of the island's banks as MPs baulk at an unprecedented tax on savings. AFP PHOTO/YIANNIS KOURTOGLOU (Photo credit should read Yiannis Kourtoglou/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CYPRUS-EU-FINANCE-PARLIAMENT

    Cypriots protest outside the parliament building in Nicosia, on March 18, 2013. Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades was seeking the backing of MPs for an EU bailout deal that slaps a levy on bank savings under harsh terms that have jolted global markets and raised fears of a new eurozone debt crisis. AFP PHOTO /PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CYPRUS-EU-FINANCE-PARLIAMENT

    Cypriots protest outside the parliament building in Nicosia, on March 18, 2013. Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades was seeking the backing of MPs for an EU bailout deal that slaps a levy on bank savings under harsh terms that have jolted global markets and raised fears of a new eurozone debt crisis. AFP PHOTO /PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CYPRUS-EU-FINANCE-PARLIAMENT

    A girl holds up a banner during a protest outside the parliament building in Nicosia, on March 18, 2013. Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades was seeking the backing of MPs for an EU bailout deal that slaps a levy on bank savings under harsh terms that have jolted global markets and raised fears of a new eurozone debt crisis. AFP PHOTO /PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CYPRUS-EU-FINANCE-PARLIAMENT

    A woman holds up a poster during a protest outside the parliament building in Nicosia, on March 18, 2013. Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades was seeking the backing of MPs for an EU bailout deal that slaps a levy on bank savings under harsh terms that have jolted global markets and raised fears of a new eurozone debt crisis. AFP PHOTO /PATRICK BAZ (Photo credit should read PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CORRECTION-CYPRUS-EU-FINANCE-PARLIAMENT

    CORRECTING DATE IN CAPTION Cypriot security guards stand outside the parliament building in Nicosia on March 18, 2013. Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades was seeking the backing of MPs for an EU bailout deal that slaps a levy on bank savings under harsh terms that have jolted global markets and raised fears of a new eurozone debt crisis. AFP PHOTO/YIANNIS KOURTOGLOU (Photo credit should read Yiannis Kourtoglou/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CYPRUS-EU-FINANCE-PARLIAMENT

    A Cypriot man holds a banner against the EU bailout deal and German Chancellor Angela Merkel's call for Cyprus to follow economic reforms outside the parliament building in Nicosia on March 18, 2013. Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades was seeking the backing of MPs for the bailout deal that slaps a levy on bank savings under harsh terms that have jolted global markets and raised fears of a new eurozone debt crisis. AFP PHOTO/YIANNIS KOURTOGLOU (Photo credit should read Yiannis Kourtoglou/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CYPRUS-EU-FINANCE-PARLIAMENT

    A sign which reads 'Hands off Cyprus' is plastered on an electricity pole outside the pariament building in the Cypriot capital Nicosia on March 18, 2013. Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades was seeking the backing of MPs for the bailout deal that slaps a levy on bank savings under harsh terms that have jolted global markets and raised fears of a new eurozone debt crisis. AFP PHOTO/YIANNIS KOURTOGLOU (Photo credit should read Yiannis Kourtoglou/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A protestor with his child hold a banner outside of parliament during a crucial meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion (US$13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • A trader plays solitaire at the Stock Exchange in Madrid, Spain, Monday, March 18, 2013. A plan to tax depositors in Cypriot banks as a way to partly fund a bailout of the Mediterranean island nation impacted on the euro-zone Monday, as officials in Spain and Italy tried over the weekend to reassure their citizens by saying the situation in Cyprus is unique, and that bank deposits in their countries will remain safe.(AP Photo/Andres Kudacki).

  • A protestor shout slogans outside of parliament during a meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion (US$13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • Nicos Anastasiades

    Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades, left, and President of the Parliament Yiannakis Omirou walk toward the parliament following a meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion (US$13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • A police officer stands by a protest banner outside of parliament before a meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion (US$13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • A police officer stands on duty behind protest banners outside of parliament before a meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion (US$13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • A police officer stands by a protest banner outside of parliament before a meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion ($13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • A protestor shout slogans outside of parliament during a meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion (US$13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • Children are seen by a protest banner held by protestors outside of the parliament during a crucial meeting in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, March 18, 2013. Cyprus' president is briefing lawmakers ahead of a crucial parliamentary vote on a controversial levy on bank deposits that the cash-strapped country's creditors have demanded in exchange for a euro10 billion (US$13 billion) rescue package.(AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

  • Nikos Anastasiades

    In this image made from video, Cyprus' president Nikos Anastasiades addresses the nation in a televised broadcast, Nicosia, Sunday, March 17, 2013. Anastasiades said Sunday he is trying to amend a detested bailout plan that would tax bank deposits across the country to reduce its effect on small savers, but he also urged lawmakers to approve the bailout plan Monday, saying it is essential to save the country from bankruptcy. (AP Photo/RIKSAT)