LIFESTYLE

Diet Soft Drinks 'Cause Teeth Decay Similar To Cocaine And Meth' (PICTURES)

31/05/2013 13:04 BST

Many weight watchers will opt for diet soft drinks because of the low calorie and fat content, but shocking pictures revealing the damaging effect that these drinks can have on teeth might make dieters think again.

A recent study has revealed that diet soft drinks can erode tooth enamel in a similar way to class-A drugs, crack cocaine or methamphetamine.

The report, published in General Dentistry, documents the teeth of three individuals: one diet soft drink consumer, one methamphetamine addict and one habitual crack cocaine addict.

diet soda teeth

A comparative photograph of a methamphetamine addict and excessive soft drink consumer

"Each person experienced severe tooth erosion caused by the high acid levels present in their 'drug' of choice - -meth, crack, or soda," lead report author Dr. Mohamed A. Bassiouny, a professor of restorative dentistry at Temple University's Kornberg School of Dentistry, said in a statement.

The American Beverage Association disputed the case study, according to USA Health Daily.

"The woman referenced in this article did not receive dental health services for more than 20 years -- two-thirds of her life," they said in a statement. "To single out diet soda consumption as the unique factor in her tooth decay and erosion -- and to compare it to that from illicit drug use -- is irresponsible."

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They added: "The body of available science does not support that beverages are a unique factor in causing tooth decay or erosion."

Speaking to Business Insider, lead-author Bassiouny defended the study, claiming that he had seen many soda-related erosions during his dental career.

"I was trying to make a parallel between drug abusers — and the usual neglect for themselves — and put this with the same traits of someone who drinks diet soda," Bassiouny said.

Earlier this year it was revealed that sugary soft drinks could be causing almost 200,000 deaths a year worldwide and the Harvard School of Public Health claim that one can of fizzy drink per day increases the risk of heart disease by nearly a quarter.

According to HuffPost Canada soft drinks are not the only beverage that are bad for your health.

They spoke to registered dietitian Patricia Chuey to find out the truth about 'healthy drinks'.

HuffPost UK Lifestyle were surprised by the results. Take a look.

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