Remember how Willy Wonka created chewing gum that had all the wonderful, evocative flavours of a roast dinner? Well, this isn't like that.

Pilgrims Choice cheese have mocked up a Christmas dinner cheese log containing the 'best elements' of the meal and the result is the Anti Christmas. The log contains carrots, turkey flavouring, candied cherries and apple - and the pièce de résistance: brussel sprouts.

cheese

An abomination? Yes indeed, but it gets worse. There's the matter of Pudding Cheese.

For those procrastinators who can't decide between sweet and savoury, the Pudding Cheese is the perfect marriage. It contains brandy-soaked sultanas, raisins and currants, candied cherries and apple, cinnamon and a special Christmas liqueur.

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Both cheeses aren't available to consumers - yet. But be warned: that could be about to change. "With Pilgrims Choice Christmas Dinner Cheese and Christmas Pudding Cheese families can enjoy Christmas dinner as often as they like without all the hard work and hassle that usually comes with it," reads the press release.

Would you give it a nibble?

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Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • Mexico: Escamoles

    Escamoles are sometimes called "insect caviar" because they're made from ant larvae harvested from plants. This Mexican delicacy is fried up and served in tacos and other dishes. Apparently, escamoles have a yummy buttery taste and cottage-cheese constancy if you can get past the fact that they're bugs.

  • Sardinia: Casu Marzu

    Like Escamoles, Casu Marzu also relies on insect larvae. This pricey cheese, however, is covered in <em>live</em> bugs that give the cheese it's distinct taste. <a href="http://newyork.grubstreet.com/2011/11/casu-marzu-rotten-cheese-video.html" target="_blank">Watch this video to see a close-up of the writhing larvae in action. </a>

  • Iceland: Hakarl

    <a href="http://blogs.villagevoice.com/forkintheroad/2009/12/let_us_now_prai_5.php" target="_blank">Anthony Bourdain called the Icelandic dish Hakarl "the single worst, most disgusting and terrible tasting thing."</a> This may be because the flesh comes from a Greenland shark that is so high in uric acid that it's inedible without first curing the meat for 6-8 weeks.

  • Scotland: Haggis

    Scotts take pride in this stomach-churning dish, a mix of sheep's innards tied up in a sheep's stomach. <a href="http://rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/24/denying-american-scots-their-holiday-haggis/" target="_blank">After a 40-year ban on sheep's lung in the U.S., this year Scotts-Americans celebrated that it was finally legal to make traditional haggis once again. </a>

  • China: Hasma

    You may have tried frog's legs during dim sum but probably not Hasma. This Chinese dessert is made from the dried tissue around the fallopian tubes of frogs. You might not want seconds for this treat.

  • Ecuador: Cuy

    In Ecuador, guinea pigs are considered a special delicacy. <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pam-grout/eating-guinea-pig-in-ecua_b_969983.html" target="_blank">So much so, that a mating pair of the furry creatures are offered as wedding gifts. </a> Cuy are cooked spread-eagle a spit and then served.

  • Phillipines: Balut

    <a href="http://www.theatlanticwire.com/national/2011/08/downtown-new-york-ready-balut/41051/" target="_blank">When the Filipino restaurant Maharlika opened in 2011 in NYC, it caused a stir because it was one of the few restaurants in the U.S. that offered balut. </a> The contentious dish is a delicacy in the Philippines, and it consists of a boiled, partially-developed duck embryo.

  • Iran: Kale Pache

    No part of the sheep goes to waste in this Iranian dish. Kale Pache (or Kaleh Pacheh) is an Iranian soup made from sheep's head, hooves, and stomach boiled in spices. Other versions of this dish appear in various Arab countries.

  • Norway: Lutefisk

    Historically, Nordic people lived off of lutefisk during the winter. Today, Lutefisk is still enjoyed by Scandinavian communities in Minneapolis during Christmas. The Nordic delicacy is made of cod or hake that is dried, jellied in lye, and then cooked in butter. It a very pungent dish, and the Village Voice called Lukefish's odor<a href="http://blogs.villagevoice.com/forkintheroad/2009/12/let_us_now_prai_1.php" target="_blank">"something like the smell outside a seafood resetaurant after the garbage is put out on the hottest day of summer."</a>

  • BONUS: Spain: Criadillas

    This dish will make a man out of you. Criadilla is the Spanish word for bull testicle. If you can stomach a criadilla, the rest of this list should be cake.