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French President's Office Deny Hollande-Trierweiler Relationship Split

25/01/2014 14:29 GMT | Updated 25/01/2014 14:59 GMT
ASSOCIATED PRESS
French President Francois Hollande's companion Valerie Trierweiler arrives for a meeting dubbed 'The Mobilisation against sexual violence towards women in conflict' attended by the first ladies of African nations, held alongside the Summit for Peace and Security in Africa, at the Musee d'Orsay, in Paris, Friday, Dec. 6, 2013. France is hosting dozens of African leaders for a summit on security, just as the French military is launching an intervention in the Central African Republic and encouraging African governments to take more responsibility for peacemaking on the continent. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Media reports that suggested President Francois Hollande would officially announce his separation from his partner today are 'false', according to the French leader's office.

The BBC reports that representatives of President Hollande say "false rumours" have been circulating in the French press.

According to The Journal du Dimanche newspaper, Hollande was keen to resolve the issue of the couple's future before his partner Valerie Trierweiler, who acts as the country's official first lady, went on a charity trip to India.

Francois Hollande has been under pressure to reveal more detail about his relationship status, after allegations of an affair with French actress Julie Gayet surfaced in the French edition of Closer magazine.

Mr. Hollande was pictured arriving at Gayet’s flat near the Elysee Palace on a three-wheeled moped driven by his bodyguard.

However, a spokesman for the Elysee told the BBC: "There will be no announcement today (Saturday). They are false rumours circulating in the French media."

Earlier this week, Valerie Trierweiler was accused of causing £2.5m of damage to the Élysée Palace during a rampage after she found out about François Hollande’s alleged affair.

The latest edition of Closer magazine claimed the French president's partner smashed national treasures including a Louis XVI Sèvres vase.

However the claims were also "categorically" denied by the office responsible for presidential furniture.