Gulf imams have issued a Fatwa against Muslims travelling to Mars.

Likening attempts to send astronauts on a one way trip to the Red Planet to suicide, the clerics said no good Muslim could agree to go knowing he would not return.

The ruling was issued by the General Authority of Islamic Affairs and Endowment (GAIAE), a group of imams in the United Arab Emirates.

It came after more than 500 people from Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries were said to have signed up for a spot on the Mars One mission to the planet - a technically dubious attempt to send explorers to our nearest neighbour in space by 2025.

The Mars One mission would use a worldwide reality TV show to raise more than $6 billion, enough to send its selected team to the planet and give them a reasonable attempt at survival... it claims.

More than 200,000 from around the world have paid various amounts of money to sign up for one of the spots on the missions. Mars One insists that 1058 people will take part in trials - though how any would ever step foot on Mars is unknown.

Experts point to the lack of solutions to problems such as radiation poisoning, fuel, landing and even waste disposal as evidence that the Mars One plan is not likely to succeed.

But just in case, the GAIAE issued its ruling to try and dissuade others from signing up. They said that according to the Quran suicide is forbidden and leaving on the mission would be akin to choosing death over life.

The report by KhaleejTimes said that the committee, led by Professor Dr Farooq Hamada, believed:

"Protecting life against all possible dangers and keeping it safe is an issue agreed upon by all religions and is clearly stipulated in verse 4/29 of the Holy Quran: Do not kill yourselves or one another. Indeed, Allah is to you ever Merciful."

Mars, as you may recall, is a poisoning, irradiated death planet, 141.6 miles from the Sun, with an average temperature on the equator roughly equivalent to the poles on Earth, no breathable atmosphere, and almost no water.

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  • A space station is shown in this undated handout artist's rendering. Kalpana space station, which the artist says is his update of the space station in "2001- A Space Odyssey." Bryan Versteeg hasn't stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child - all the while dreaming of someday living in space.

  • A Martian space habitat is shown in this undated handout artist's rendering. Artist Bryan Versteeg started working on the Martian space habitat after he was approached by the founders of the Mars One Foundation, which is planning a one-way mission to the red planet.

  • A space station is shown in this undated handout artist's rendering. Kalpana space station, which the artist says is his update of the space station in "2001- A Space Odyssey." Bryan Versteeg hasn't stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child - all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who's becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • A Martian space habitat is shown in this undated handout artist's rendering. Artist Bryan Versteeg started working on the Martian space habitat after he was approached by the founders of the Mars One Foundation, which is planning a one-way mission to the red planet.

  • A space station is shown in this undated handout artist's rendering. Kalpana space station, which the artist says is his update of the space station in "2001- A Space Odyssey." Bryan Versteeg hasn't stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child - all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who's becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • Space concept artist Bryan Versteeg at work at his home studio in Calgary, Alberta on Tuesday, February 11, 2014. Versteeg hasn't stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child - all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who's becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • Space concept artist Bryan Versteeg at work at his home studio in Calgary, Alberta on Tuesday, February 11, 2014. Versteeg hasn't stopped drawing ever since he got his first crayons and left marks all over the walls as a child - all the while dreaming of someday living in space. He still remembers that sketch books and drawing pencils were the predominant gifts on his fifth and sixth birthdays. So began the career of the 38-year-old Calgary space artist who's becoming known for his futuristic out-of-this-world illustrations.

  • Check out photos from the Red Planet, as taken by NASA's Curiosity Rover.

  • This Aug. 9, 2011 image provided by NASA shows a view from the Mars Rover Opportunity from the Western rim of the Endeavour Crater.

  • This undated image provided by NASA shows the Mars rover Opportunity looking back at an outcrop where it spent the Martian winter in 2012.

  • This image provided by NASA shows a rock that the NASA Mars rover Opportunity examined in 2012.

  • This image provided by NASA shows a shadow self-portrait taken by NASA’s Opportunity rover on the Martian surface.

  • This image provided by NASA shows a panoramic view from NASA's Mars Exploration rover Opportunity of "Solander Point."

  • This image provided by NASA shows the late-afternoon shadow cast by the Mars rover Opportunity at Endeavour Crater. The six-wheel rover landed on Mars in January 2004 and is still going strong. (AP Photo/NASA)

  • Handout photo issued by NASA Wednesday 21 January 2004 of a image mosaic taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit.

  • Nasa undated computer generated image of what the it's Spirit rover would look like on the surface of Mars.

  • This magnified image taken by the Mars Rover Opportunity shows evidence of past flowing water.

  • This magnified image taken by the Mars Rover Opportunity shows evidence of past flowing water.