Why You Should Wear A Veil On Your Wedding Day

02/06/2014 08:46 | Updated 22 May 2015

Veils - probably the most weirdly divisive accessory for brides. One friend will tell you it's imperative to wear one, while others will insist the look lost its fizz in the 1980s.

However, there's no denying the nation fell slightly back in love with a sheen of lace, a puff of tulle, the moment the Duchess of Cambridge appeared on her wedding day in 2011.

And when Kate Moss donned a 16th century-style Juliet cap veil to say "I do" to Jamie Hince in the same year, it seemed to indicate this was, once again, the accessory du jour for any fashion-conscious bride.

kate moss wedding

Perhaps it was a rediscovery of how the accessory adds a sense of occasion, perhaps it was seeing such beautiful sheaths on such beautiful girls, but either way suddenly not having a veil felt a little bit killjoy.

So let's talk about what veil you should wear. To begin with, think about the length of your dress. To avoid looking like something out of a Gratton catalogue circa 1991, you must team long with long, short with short. A flowing lace veil will immeasurably add to a sweeping train while a bubble of tulle simply can't fail to make a tea-length swirl or a cocktail-style slip big day beautiful.

There's no denying a tiara adds princess sparkle to the overall look, but brides on a budget shouldn't worry if they simply don't have the cash. A veil can be pinned and styled. Also, unless it's a tiara that matches your veil it can look a bit out of place. Remember, the veil should be the star accessory on your head. An uber-glittery tiara can make the overall look seem, well, a bit much.

It's perfectly acceptable to veil your face prior to your vows but again, brides shouldn't feel any pressure to do so. Rather than being absolute protocol these days, it's the bride's choice. Also, on the morning of your wedding you may feel - after hours of hair and make-up - that covering your face is a bit of a waste (not to mention claustrophobic).

A veil can add a freshness to your big day look, and personally, I'm glad I did wear one when I got married. Mine was a shoulder-length froth of tulle which I found on Etsy and wore for the ceremony before changing to a fresh flower headpiece for the afternoon and a gold headband for the evening.

Is it extra expense? Yes. But that moment your veil is pinned to your hair, you feel exactly like you should on your wedding day - a bride.


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