Huffpost World

World Cup 2014: 17 Pictures That Show Brazil Is Really Not Ready For The World Cup

Posted: Updated:

The World Cup is days away, but is Brazil ready? It certainly doesn't look like it.

With the planet's most watched sporting event kicking off on Thursday, protests and city-wide strikes threaten to disrupt Brazil's final preparations.

Additionally, there are serious concerns that some of the venues will not even be ready, while other infrastructure projects are also massively behind schedule.

Before they even see their teams battle on the fields, football fans arriving in Brazil will first have to fight their way past airport scaffolding, terminal flooding and two-hour taxi lines.

Brazil has had seven years and spent over £7bn to plan for the World Cup, but, as the images below show, with the opening of the 4-week extravaganza just days away, the country still isn't ready.

READ MORE: 14 Powerful Pictures Of Anti-Fifa Graffiti In Brazil

  • The Tancredo Neves International Airport in Confins (MG), is the gateway to thousands of Brazilians and foreign tourists for the next five weeks... Or at least it will be if it's finished.
  • LINCON ZARBIETTI/O TEMPO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO
    When the pictures were taken, still less than half of the proposed works for the World Cup have been completed.
  • LINCON ZARBIETTI/O TEMPO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO
    Brazilian authorities insist they're ready, but passengers may find themselves in for a rough landing.
  • Instagram/@lunagontijoresende
    Experts blame poor planning and excessive government control for the airport problems
  • LINCON ZARBIETTI/O TEMPO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO
    President Dilma Rousseff has dismissed complaints that Brazil isn't ready.
  • Instagram/@flabarros_1975
    "We aren't building airports just for the World Cup, just for FIFA," President Dilma Rousseff recently said. "We are building for Brazilians."
  • Instagram/@mthzbarbosa
    The Tancredo Neves International Airport, however, looks far from ready.
  • Instagram/@gvizane
    Arriving tourists will be sharing the airport with dozens of workers.
  • AP
    This, meanwhile, is the state of a stadium building site. Work is continuing at the Arena da Baixada in Curitiba, Brazil.
  • Getty Images
    On the eve of the first training session of Uruguay's national football team, employees of a cleaning company pose for a picture at the Arena do Jacare in Sete Lagoas.
  • Getty Images
    Brazilian Army soldiers take part in a simulated explosion of a radioactive device at Mane Garrincha National Stadium during a safety drill at Mane Garrincha National stadium in Brasilia on June 9.
  • AP
    This May 9, 2014 shows that work continues at the Arena da Baixada in Curitiba, Brazil.
  • Workers fix a banner before the 2014 soccer World Cup at the Arena da Baixada stadium in Curitiba, Brazil,
  • Getty Images
    A graffiti depicting Tatubola, the mascot of the World Cup, on a wall of the Maracana metro station, as restoration works take place.
  • EPA
    Men at work in the unfinished Arena Corinthians stadium, in Sao Paulo
  • EPA
    A worker puts cement on the floor of the unfinished Arena Corinthians stadium, in Sao Paulo
  • Getty Images
    A man paints the floor of a decoration on June 8, 2014 in Itaquera neighborhood, on the east side of Sao Paulo, Brazil, near the Arena Sao Paulo stadium, where the opening match of the FIFA World Cup 2014 will take place.
READ MORE:

The pictures reflect a dark tale of two World Cups — one on a field and one playing out on this country's streets.

Anti-World Cup sentiment in Brazil has been bubbling for some time and the country's fervent love of football is conflicting with public anger over charges of wasteful spending, corruption, traffic jams, strikes and a litany of other complaints.

Arguably, it speaks volumes that the people of Brazil, perhaps the greatest footballing nation in the world, do not want the World Cup.

"F*** FIFA" appears to be the general message many are trying to get across in artistic protest, with residents turning to street graffiti in an attempt to get their voices heard.

Recent polling shows half the population disapproves of Brazil hosting the event at all.

"There is certainly a mood of 'we've already paid for the party so we might as well enjoy it,'" said Juca Kfouri, one of Brazil's best-known sports commentators.

"But there is also the feeling that a lot of people are ashamed. They're ashamed to wear the Brazil jersey or put a Brazilian flag in their window because of the protests, because they don't want to be associated with the exorbitant spending on the Cup."

While Brazilians furiously attempt to finish their new stadiums, the biggest remaining question is whether spectators will even be able to get to the stadium for the opening match in São Paolo this coming Thursday.

Football fans arriving in Sao Paulo were met by chaotic traffic jams and other delays on Monday after police used tear gas to disperse striking metro workers.

The partial strike on the city's metro was set to continue for at least a sixth day after local authorities left a meeting with union leaders Monday evening without an agreement.

But the metro union announced Tuesday it has decided to suspend the subway workers' strike until Wednesday.

The union is due to meet again on Wednesday to decide whether the strike - which has caused huge delays in Brazil's biggest city - would continue.

  • The Tancredo Neves International Airport in Confins (MG), is the gateway to thousands of Brazilians and foreign tourists for the next five weeks... Or at least it will be if it's finished.
  • LINCON ZARBIETTI/O TEMPO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO
    When the pictures were taken, still less than half of the proposed works for the World Cup have been completed.
  • LINCON ZARBIETTI/O TEMPO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO
    Brazilian authorities insist they're ready, but passengers may find themselves in for a rough landing.
  • Instagram/@lunagontijoresende
    Experts blame poor planning and excessive government control for the airport problems
  • LINCON ZARBIETTI/O TEMPO/ESTADÃO CONTEÚDO
    President Dilma Rousseff has dismissed complaints that Brazil isn't ready.
  • Instagram/@flabarros_1975
    "We aren't building airports just for the World Cup, just for FIFA," President Dilma Rousseff recently said. "We are building for Brazilians."
  • Instagram/@mthzbarbosa
    The Tancredo Neves International Airport, however, looks far from ready.
  • Instagram/@gvizane
    Arriving tourists will be sharing the airport with dozens of workers.
  • AP
    This, meanwhile, is the state of a stadium building site. Work is continuing at the Arena da Baixada in Curitiba, Brazil.
  • Getty Images
    On the eve of the first training session of Uruguay's national football team, employees of a cleaning company pose for a picture at the Arena do Jacare in Sete Lagoas.
  • Getty Images
    Brazilian Army soldiers take part in a simulated explosion of a radioactive device at Mane Garrincha National Stadium during a safety drill at Mane Garrincha National stadium in Brasilia on June 9.
  • AP
    This May 9, 2014 shows that work continues at the Arena da Baixada in Curitiba, Brazil.
  • Workers fix a banner before the 2014 soccer World Cup at the Arena da Baixada stadium in Curitiba, Brazil,
  • Getty Images
    A graffiti depicting Tatubola, the mascot of the World Cup, on a wall of the Maracana metro station, as restoration works take place.
  • EPA
    Men at work in the unfinished Arena Corinthians stadium, in Sao Paulo
  • EPA
    A worker puts cement on the floor of the unfinished Arena Corinthians stadium, in Sao Paulo
  • Getty Images
    A man paints the floor of a decoration on June 8, 2014 in Itaquera neighborhood, on the east side of Sao Paulo, Brazil, near the Arena Sao Paulo stadium, where the opening match of the FIFA World Cup 2014 will take place.

Suggest a correction