Signs Of Alzheimer's Disease: How To Tell If You're At Risk

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Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting almost 500,000 people in the UK.

The first, and perhaps most well known sign of Alzheimer's disease is usually minor memory problems.

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition, which means the symptoms develop gradually and are therefore sometimes difficult to detect.

If you’re unaware of the warning signs, the disease can sometimes appear to come on quickly and be frightening for both the patient and their loved ones.

Knowing the signs of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease can better prepare you for coping with the illness, should it occur.

dementia

The above video details some of the lesser-known warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

The film states that researchers from the University of Washington analysed data from more than 2000 people and found that those who had a higher blood sugar level over the previous five year were at greater risk of suffering from dementia.

The video gives details of another study that linked higher blood pressure to a greater risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

How you walk may also be an indicator of whether or not you’re suffering from Alzheimer’s disease, or could be soon. There is evidence to suggest that a slower walking pace and shorter strides are indicative of a decline in mental skills and memory.

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Depression can also be a warning sign of dementia, especially if you suffer from both depression and diabetes.

In the video, Dr Wayne J. Katon from the University of Washington Medical School says that if you suffer from both conditions, your risk of dementia increases by more than two-fold.

And finally, your heart health can also provide a clue to Alzheimer’s disease. Studies show that 80% of Alzheimer’s patients also suffer from heart disease.
 
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