STYLE

100 Bites Diet: The Latest Weight Loss Trend?

13/08/2014 12:12 | Updated 20 May 2015

Do you eat too quickly? If this research is anything to go by, it might be time to slow down.

salad in bowl

The Wall Street Journal reports researchers have found the optimum number of bites we take a day to encourage weight loss is 100 and soon, there will be new products on the market to help track our biting patterns.

Scientists at South Carolina's Clemson University have developed the 'Bite Monitor' - a watch-like device made to analyse the way we chew.

The researchers examined the number of bites of 77 people over two weeks before finding the average number of calories per bite was 17 for me and 11 for women.

"If people take 100 bites a day, it makes the daily caloric target roughly 1,700 calories for men and 1,100 calories for women," the WSJ writes. "These targets represent a low-calorie diet according to National Institutes of Health standards."

It's thought the first product - described as a "pedometer for your mouth" - will be available to buy across the pond in 2015 for a not so cheap sum of $195 (that's around £115.)

But why all the hype around chewing? Is this just another fad diet? Michael Jensen, an endocrinologist and obesity expert at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota explained the rise of this trend.

"If you're eating too fast, you're probably not chewing and enjoying your food very well and you're probably going to be more likely to eat too much," he said.

By slowing down and taking smaller bites, you'll reduce the risk of digestion problems too.

However, there is a downside. As Dr Jensen points out, counting bites while eating pizza or a chocolate bar isn't exactly the same as chewing on a carrot stick and and "restricting people to 100 bites a day might just encourage them to take bigger mouthfuls."

Still, fad or not, with the current diet obsession it's more than likely the 'Bite Monitor' will catch on somewhere.

For more information on the 100 bite diet, read the full report here.

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