Baby Born With Liver, Intestines And Bladder Outside Her Body

14/08/2014 16:48 | Updated 22 May 2015
Baby born with liver, intestines and bladder outsider her body Baby Piper with her bladder wrapped in cling film. Pic:

Baby Piper has amazed doctors by surviving birth with three vital organs outside her body.

Piper Smith, now nine months, from King's Lynn, Norfolk, was given just a 25 per cent chance of survival when she was born with her bladder, intestine and liver outside her body.

Her mum Amanda Smith, 29, was told her unborn child had a rare weakness of the abdominal wall at her 11 week scan after doctors spotted unusual lumps.

It meant unborn Piper grew in the womb with her liver, intestine and bladder outside her body - and was not expected to survive labour.

But amazingly Piper survived against all the odds, and was born at 35 weeks with all her organs intact and fully-functioning.

Amanda and husband Wayne, 23, are now waiting for surgeons to perform a six-hour operation to put her organs back inside her body then stretch muscle over her stomach.

It means Piper is now living with her bladder sat on the outside of her stomach - wrapped in cling film to keep it moist until the she is ready for surgery.

"It was really scary when Piper was born. She was very poorly. It was like she was inside out," said Amanda. "It was really hard as I was not allowed to pick her up as she had to go straight in to the incubator.

Baby born with liver, intestines and bladder outsider her body

"The doctors said she had a 50 per cent chance of survival with her intestine and liver outside the body. When they saw the bladder was outside too they said it went down to 25 per cent. It was terrifying thinking she might not make it.

"I have to check on Piper more than a normal baby - she cannot roll on her side as her organs are there so we have to be very careful. I don't think Piper is aware of her organs being on the outside rather than on the inside. She is not in any pain.

"She is starting to sit up now and she is a very happy baby. We are really hoping that she will be able to walk eventually."

After her birth, Piper spent four days in intensive care and was eventually sent home with Amanda from Great Ormond Street Hospital after five weeks.

But at eight weeks she was rushed back to Great Ormond Street with a twist in her bowel and spent five days in intensive care.

Piper, who also suffers from spina bifida - which her family hope will be correctable - will need a colostomy bag to pass solids until she is at least four year old.

"The doctors offered me a termination, but I felt I could not have one - I wanted to give her a chance," said Amanda. "And she has been a miracle. She is a little fighter."

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