Computers Are A Back Pain 'Time Bomb' For Children

14/08/2014 16:55 | Updated 22 May 2015

Boy leaning on laptop

Children who spend too much time crouched over computers are facing a health 'time bomb' of neck and back pain.

More than two thirds of primary school children have reported experiencing back or neck pain over the course of one year, according to research.

The number of children receiving treatment for back or neck pain has doubled in the past six months, researchers at Swansea University claim.

The findings underline a growing concern among the medical community about the effects of excessive use of computers, games consoles, smartphones and tablet computers on young people's developing bodies.

Lorna Taylor, a physiotherapist who helped researchers carry out the study, said: "Modern lifestyles and the increase in technology are having detrimental effects on our children's musculoskeletal health and, if not addressed in school and at home now, will have far reaching effects for our children, the future working generation and society. This is a health care time bomb.

"It's vital we instil good habits and provide resources so children can be comfortable, be able to concentrate, reach their full potential and work and play sport as they decide, and not be limited by preventable disability and a life in pain."

The British Chiropractic Association (BCA) has also reported 'younger and younger' people attending practices with chronic back problems.

And Jon Abbott, the managing director for ergonomics and safety at Cardinus Risk Management, said: "For many years we have recognised the risk of ergonomics injuries to adults in the workplace, and government advice on display screen equipment has long targeted adults.

"But now our younger generations are using technology more regularly at school and home and yet we are failing to recognise and address the risks.

"It cannot be right that we work so hard to protect the working population but fail to recognise the impact technology has on children at a critical stage of their physiological development."

And what about the 10 tonne schoolbags too?

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