STYLE

What Central Heating Does To Your Skin &Amp; How To Keep It Glowing

14/08/2014 16:35 | Updated 22 May 2015

There's no denying the Autumn nip in the air and you're probably thinking it's time to turn on the central heating.

But you might want to reconsider your skincare regime when you. Because turning that heating switch on for winter? Yep, it's going to effect your face.

We spoke to skincare expert, genius facialist and Founder of Skinesis Sarah Chapman to find out exactly what heating does to your skin and how you can prevent it (but still stay cosy).

What does central heating do to your skin?

"The combination of cold weather and central heating can be incredibly harsh on the skin and can lead to increased sensitivity and dryness during winter," says Sarah.

"Dry, dull and sallow complexions are a common winter skin concern caused by dehydration; many people also don't remember to drink as much water when it is colder.

"When not cleansed and exfoliated properly, this leads to a build-up of dead skin cells and sebum which clogs pore and leaves skin dull looking and sluggish."

What products should you add to your skincare routine to combat against any negative side effects?

"Make sure you cleanse properly for a few minutes morning and night and exfoliate two times a week using a mild and gentle exfoliator to avoid tearing and scratching the skin," advises Sarah.

She adds: "You can even mix your exfoliator in with your cleanser for a quick exfoliating cleanse and to slough off dulling and clogging dead skin cells; this is excellent for brightening and refreshing your complexion."

Is there anything else you can do?

"Facial massage is a key part of my skincare philosophy and is unbeatable for getting an instant glow," says Sarah. "Use your knuckles (held in loose fists) and finger tips to roll, knead and drum life back into your skin."

"Drinking plenty of water is also essential but this will only be effective if you have a healthy level of essential skin lipids to hold on to moisture.

"Take omega oils, these replace the essential fats in your skin that lock onto moisture in the skin," she adds. "Hyaluronic acid supplements are also good or apply it topically in your skincare; it can hold up to 1000 times its own weight in moisture within the skin."

Want to freshen up your skin? Check out our Top 10 exfoliators...

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