LIFESTYLE

The G-Spot May Not Exist, But The 'CUV Complex' Could Be The Key To Sexual Pleasure, Experts Say

27/08/2014 12:00 BST

In the majority of women's magazines (Cosmo, we're looking at you) a woman's G-spot is listed as the magical gateway to sexual pleasure.

But new research suggests the ‘holy grail’ of female orgasms may not even exist.

Before you panic that you will never have an orgasm ever again, be reassured that all is not lost.

A study, published in the journal Nature Reviews Urology, says it isn't just the G-spot that brings a woman sexual pleasure but a much larger "intimate area", named the clitourethrovaginal (CUV) complex, which includes the uterus and the clitoris.

woman surprised

The group of Italian doctors, led by Emmanuele A. Jannini, professor of endocrinology and sexology at Tor Vergata university, Rome, say we shouldn't just focus on one area for stimulation.

The report states: "Although no single structure consistent with a distinct G-spot has been identified, the vagina is not a passive organ but a highly dynamic structure with an active role in sexual arousal and intercourse.

"The anatomical relationships and dynamic interactions between the clitoris, urethra, and anterior vaginal wall have led to the concept of a clitourethrovaginal (CUV) complex, defining a variable, multifaceted morphofunctional area that, when properly stimulated during penetration, could induce orgasmic responses."

Put simply, there's a whole lot of ways to experience sexual pleasure, and you don't have to rely on anybody navigating your G-spot to reach climax.

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This isn't the first study to suggest the G-spot is nothing but a sex myth - back in 2010, a report by King’s College London published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine also said there was no evidence to suggest the legendary erogenous region existed.

In 2012, Dr Amichai Kilchevsky, a urologist from the Yale-New Haven Hospital in Conneticut said: “Objective measures have failed to provide strong and consistent evidence for the existence of an anatomical site that could be related to the famed G-spot.

“Lots of women feel almost as though it is their fault they can't find it. The reality is that it is probably not something, historically or evolutionarily, that should even exist.”

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