LIFESTYLE

Why You Should Never Leave Your Dog In A Car - It's Been Scientifically Proven

15/09/2014 17:34 BST | Updated 15/09/2014 17:59 BST
Izzet Keribar via Getty Images

September is here, summer is over and unless we're going to witness an Indian summer (which is pretty unlikely) then it's perfectly acceptable to leave your dog in the car now that temperatures have cooled, right?

Actually, that's completely wrong.

According to the RSPCA, when it’s 22°C (72°F) outside, the temperature inside a car can reach up to 47°C within 60 minutes. In other words, your dog will start to cook - an action that can not only create serious health problems for your pooch, but can potentially prove fatal.

A study conducted in 2002 found that the temperature inside an enclosed car rose 19°F in just 10 minutes. The study also found that opening the windows didn't reduce or delay this increase.

The RSPCA suggests that certain breeds of dog will be more prone to suffering from heatstroke than others. For example: dogs with short snouts, fatter/muscly dogs, long-haired breeds, old/young dogs and dogs with certain diseases or that are on medication.

According to PETA, animals can sustain brain damage, or even die, from heatstroke in just 15 minutes.

Put simply, the time it takes you to pop into the supermarket on the way home.

Our advice? If you're going out and you won't be able to take your dog(s) with you (for example, to a restaurant or shopping centre) then leave them at home where it's cool - they'll thank you for it (with a lick, or something).

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Finally, if you ever think that your pet (or somebody else's pet) might be suffering from heatstroke then the RSPCA suggest there are a number of things you can do to try and cool them down:

:: Immediately douse them with cool (not cold) water, to avoid shock – you could use a shower, or spray and place them in the breeze of a fan.

:: Let them drink small amounts of cool water.

:: Continue dousing until their breathing settles – never cool dogs so much that they begin shivering.

:: Once your dog is cool, immediately go to the vet.

To conclude, dog's are cool - let's keep them that way. #SayNoToHotDogs