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FIFA 15: EA Sports' Flagship Game Reviewed

26/09/2014 10:03 BST | Updated 26/09/2014 12:59 BST

Fifa games are like modern Hollywood blockbusters. The trailer's look fantastic and persuade you to part with your money but the real thing leaves you satisfied and wanting more.

It's all about the authenticity when it comes to Fifa. Every Premier League ground is included in this year's edition but it's far from a case of all style and no substance. This is a nuanced Fifa; still fun and frenetic but lacking a game-changing feature to propel it to the next level.

There is actually very little different in terms of the gameplay from 14 and, after the madcap World Cup edition, EA Sports have reverted back to the serene pace that has served them so well over the years. Like football, Fifa has become more tactical but, unlike The Game, it has not endangered the fun factor.

Opponents jostle with each other over fouls, the celebrations are more realistic and the songbook has been updated. Punch-drunk Manchester United fans can sing along to "20 times" despite their catastrophic campaign under David Moyes and the crowd don't sound as though they are watching on a time-delay anymore.

The "Legendary" setting is not ridiculously hard anymore. Last year, dross like Fulham could pass the ball out from defence like a Pep Guardiola side but not anymore and you vs the computer is no longer a mismatch.

Fifa has various kinks, still. When choosing your line-up or making substitutions, you can only use the analogue stick to move between players before and during games, which is a bugbear. Throw-ins are still erratic, the goalkeepers are about as reliable as an England international and defenders turn with all the grace of Per Mertesacker.

Is it a step forward? The presentation is. That Burnley supporters can marvel at Turf Moor in computer graphic form is testament to Fifa's stylish development, although if you're a sucker for nostalgia Ivy Lane is always an alternative.

Addicts will be disappointed there is not one outstanding new facet to get excited about. Free-kicks, for instance, are too bland when they are crying out for innovation. Getting angry is all part of the Fifa fun, though.