POLITICS

Lord Sugar Wants To Fire Labour Leader Ed Miliband And Bring Back Gordon Brown

14/10/2014 21:30 BST | Updated 14/10/2014 21:59 BST
Oli Scarff via Getty Images
LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 18: Baron Sugar listens at the British Chamber of Commerce Annual Conference held at the headquarters of BAFTA on March 18, 2010 in London, England. The annual conference entitled 'Preparing for Change - Setting the Business Agenda' will hear from keynote speakers from business, politics academia and the media including: Lord Mandelson, Kenneth Clarke, Lord Adonis, Baron Sugar, Trevor Phillips, Stephen Hester and Christine Lagarde. The British Chamber of Commerce is a network of 56 accredited Chambers of Commerce across the UK serving over 100,000 businesses, it is celebrating its 150th anniversary throughout 2010. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

Lord Sugar wants to tell Ed Miliband ‘You’re fired’ and replace the flagging Labour leader with… Gordon Brown.

That’s right - the one-time business tsar has called for the return of the last prime minister, who Sugar claims had a “bad deal” due to the 2008 financial collapse.

Speaking on LBC on Tuesday, the former Spurs chairman and doyen of the home computer market (30 years ago) told Iain Dale: “I wish he’d come back as leader of the Labour Party to be honest with you”.

He added: “He took over from Blair in 2008 or 2007 when the real problems in the world economy broke and he got the blame, as far as England is concerned. It’s absolutely wrong. It wasn’t his fault.”

Brown received plaudits from pro-union politicians for his campaigning during the Scottish referendum debate, delivering a stirring speech ahead of the vote, widely regarded as the best of his life.

Miliband has come under increasing pressure in recent weeks following a lackluster party conference, flagging numbers in the polls and a tight race with Ukip in the Heywood by-election.

On Monday, Miliband called for party unity, telling a packed meeting of Labour's MPs and peers that he would fight "with every fibre of my being" to win the election

He said: "Normally after an election we show disunity and division. We have had four years of unity. I am not going to let us, seven months before an election, start lapsing into the bad habits of the past."

"There will be ups and downs which make the last few weeks look easy… I know that we will pass that test."

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