STYLE

Birch Water: Is It Worth The Hype?

13/11/2014 16:31 | Updated 20 May 2015

From coconut to aloe, 'super waters' have been a favourite with models, celebrities and beauty junkies for a while now. But there's a new drink on the scene.

Birch tree water is set to become the next big thing in 2015, thanks to its multiple health and beauty benefits.

A model drinks coconut water backstage

The extract, which comes from the tree trunk, has been linked to treating headaches, reducing cholesterol and thanks to its diuretic properties, aiding kidney and liver function.

"The birch tree has been called 'the tree of life' and used as a medicinal plant for centuries throughout Eastern and Northern Europe as well as Northern China," Ultimate Wellbeing Specialist Akcelina Cvijetic explains.

"It has traditionally been linked to purification and detoxification, thus aiding in flushing out of the toxins from the body as well as excess water. This is why various birch products have been praised in eliminating cellulite, water retention and weight loss. Other reported health benefits include anti-inflammatory properties which may explain their traditional use for conditions such as arthritis, cystitis, eczema and cholesterol."

What's In It: Coconut Water

The sap also contains electrolytes such as potassium helping with hydration as well as flavonoids rich in antioxidant properties, but as Akcelina warns - commercial versions will contain added sugar.

"Just like there is a difference between fresh, young coconut water and packaged versions, there is a difference between the real McCoy birch water and commercial alternatives," she says.

Added ingredients aside, it's also worth noting that there has been little evidence on how birch tree extract can benefit humans.

"I'm a big fan of organic Birch Cellulite Oil produced by reputable companies like Weleda," adds Akcelina. "But I would like to see more scientific research on the birch water, so that we can safely enjoy the benefits of this heralded drink de jour."

Not convinced about this latest health fad? Try these energy-boosting foods instead:

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