Anti-Bullying Week 2013: How To Get Involved

14/11/2014 15:31 | Updated 22 May 2015

A girl being bullied

Anti-Bullying Week 2013 runs from November 18 to November 22, and aims to encourage children and young people to think about and act on creating a future without bullying. This year Anti-Bullying Week has a particular focus on cyber bullying.

The aims for the week (18 to 22 November) include:

To ensure all children and young people are equipped to recognise and challenge bullying behaviour wherever it happens - whether face to face or in cyberspace.

To equip schools, colleges and youth service leaders with resources to encourage youth led anti-bullying initiatives and the positive use of new technologies.

To educate those who support and work with children to recognise those who may be particularly vulnerable to bullying through new technologies - encouraging an inclusive approach to all e-safety education.

For more information visit the Anti-Bullying Alliance.

Here are five easy ways that you and your children can get involved with Anti-Bullying Week 2013:

1. Get talking

One of the best ways to help children protect themselves is to keep an open dialogue about bullying going. We've put together some tips on how to talk with children who may be being bullied.

2. Raise some money

There are lots of fun and exciting things that you and your friends and family can do to raise money, whether it's a dress down day, a raffle or even making your own themed greetings cards to sell them to friends and family. Check out for more ideas.

3. Print out a poster

You can put these up in your school or youth group to make sure that your children's friends and classmates know where to get support if they're being bullied. You can visit for downloads.

4. Get creative

Encourage your children to get their creative juices flowing by making a play, picture or collage, or even a film about bullying, how it can make them feel, and how they can work together to put a stop to it.

5. Wear a blue wristband

You can get your wristband at to show that you're standing up to bullies.

For more information, support and advice, visit our dedicated bullying hub on Parentdish.


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