ENTERTAINMENT

'The Fall' Review - Episode 2: Gillian Anderson Feeling Responsible, Jamie Dornan Creepy, And So Cheeky With It!

20/11/2014 22:00 GMT | Updated 21/11/2014 08:59 GMT

"You were the only girl, and you've betrayed me."

Thus did Jamie Dornan's Bad Paul Spector ring the bell of doom for wrong-place-wrong-time Rose, former girlfriend turned police witness, in this second episode of 'The Fall'.

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REVIEW: The Fall Episode 1 - Gillian Anderson, Jamie Dornan Back And Keeping Audiences On Edge Of Seats

Any fears that Jamie Dornan would not be able to keep up his level of commitment to his role in the wake of global appreciation were fully dispelled this week, as he played, calmly, meticulously, chilling convincingly, a man convinced his evil deeds are all done for the right reasons. Plus we learned a little more about his traumatised past, with a mother who abandoned him. Go figure.

the fall

If this was creepy...

Meanwhile, Gillian Anderson's beautiful brow was looking more furrowed than usual, as Superintendent Gibson realised that the police's actions may have been responsible for Rose's disappearance. Visiting the morgue seemed to cheer her up, mind you. What IS going on between her and the comely pathologist?

And, the other big question - what on earth has that babysitter Katie got between her ears? Actress Aisling Franciosi cut a believable mix of an excitable teenage girl, palpably in thrall to the older Spector, but also increasingly high on her own power, until she got a lot more than she bargained for in yet another disturbing scene. Forgot the fantasy father figure, woman, and call the police!

the fall

... then this was creepy, and mind-blowingly cheeky

Meanwhile, Nice Paul Spector was also back on show, proving a sympathetic bereavement counsellor, lending a comforting ear to his very own victim, twitching almost imperceptibly at her talk of guilt, bondage and haircuts, and spotting another neat brunette while he was about it. Never mind the terrible crimes being committed, we have to doff our caps to the absolute cheek of it all. Writer Alan Cubbitt has a dark, dark sense of humour.

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