PARENTS

Toys For 2015: The Wombles, Clangers, Danger Mouse And Thunderbirds To Make A Comeback

19/01/2015 11:40 | Updated 20 May 2015

THE WOMBLES

Retro toys The Wombles, the Clangers, Danger Mouse and Thunderbirds are to make a comeback in 2015.

Although sales of hi-tech toys such as PlayStation and Xbox have rocketed, this years is set to be the year of nostalgia, partly as a result of television trends.

Old favourites returning to our screens include The Wombles, the Clangers, Thunderbirds and Danger Mouse with his sidekick Penfold. SuperTed will also be back in 2016.

A toy fair at Olympia in London this week also features a Tiny Tears doll, a new James Bond Aston Martin DB5 by Corgi, and Thunderbirds spin-offs such as a Tracy Island playset, which a generation ago sold 450,000 in three years.

Sooty and Sweep puppets, Care Bears and Bagpuss toys will all also be back on the shelves, experts say.

Natasha Crookes, of the British Toy and Hobby Association, said 2015 would be an unusual year.

She said: "Not only are there a lot of anniversaries but there are a number of shows returning for the next generation."

Danger Mouse, and his sidekick Penfold, will return to our screens this year, with a new series on CBBC.

The star mouse himself will be voiced by Pointless host Alexander Armstrong, with Kevin Eldon as the voice of Penfold.

Alexander said: "As a lifelong fan of Danger Mouse I was ecstatic just to know that the show was coming back.

"To be actually involved with the reboot and to be taking DM out to a whole new generation is about as close to a dream job as you could wish for."

Meanwhile, The Clangers is making a comeback and will be narrated by Monty Python star Michael Palin, 71.

He said it was a 'real privilege' to be associated with the return of the animated kids' favourite.

He was selected by Daniel Postgate, whose late father Oliver was one of the co-creators of the original show.

The Clangers ran in the 60s and 70s. It has been recreated for the BBC's children's channel, Cbeebies at a cost of £5million. Created by Oliver Postgate and Peter Firmin, the programme debuted in 1969.