PARENTS

Toddler's Rare Birthmark Looks Like 'Angel Wings'

12/02/2015 10:32 | Updated 20 May 2015

Toddler's rare birthmark looks like 'angel wings'

A toddler has a rare birthmark which makes it look like he has feathered 'angel' wings across his back.

Oliver Brown, two, has a huge brown mole which covers the top of his back and shoulders.

His mum Steph, 34, calls her son her 'angel' to boost his confidence.

But doctors have warned that the unusual condition could be deadly if it turns cancerous so little Oliver has to be checked every three months.

Steph, from Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire, said: "He actually has his on the top half of his back so it looks like wings. There can be lots of questions because it comes up to the nape of his neck and so is visible.

"As he gets older we would hope he can accept himself for who he is.

"We have all got these bits of ourselves that we do not like and we have to accept them."

Oliver was born with Congenital Melanocytic Naevi (CMN) - or oversized moles or birthmarks.

Toddler's rare birthmark looks like 'angel wings'

Steph told Mason's News: "Oliver is one of the fortunate ones. Some children are riddled with moles and even get them on their eyelids.

"He actually has his on the top half of his back so it looks like wings. There can be lots of questions because it comes up to the nape of his neck and so is visible.

"'He is lucky in the sense he is such a cutie pop, everyone seems to think so, and I think people will overlook his condition."

Lucy Hardwidge of the Caring Matters Now help group, said: "Children with CMN have to be very careful.

"There is an increased risk of cancer so factor 50 sun cream is a must and we now have UV protection clothing which can be used.

"But it's also important to let them have their childhood and the kids still need vitamin D.

"Our latest research has found the cause of 80 per cent of CMN cases and it's caused by a mutated gene which develops as the baby is in the womb.

"This is why it's so important to give babies MRI scans at birth and regularly to keep an eye on it in case it spreads."

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