COMEDY
17/09/2015 10:25 BST | Updated 17/09/2015 10:59 BST

Pythons Found In Toilet In Australia, Measure Three Metres Each

In today's most bum-clenching news, two pythons measuring a combined length of five and a half metres have been rescued from a toilet bowl in Queensland, Australia.

The terrifying pictures come from zoology student and volunteer snake catcher Elliot Budd, who was called in to rescue the reptiles.

We'll warn you, they might be horrific enough to stop you defecating. Forever.

python in toilet

"Speaking to a few other snake catchers, they've heard of it happening," Budd told Mashable. "Maybe it happens once every couple of years, if you're lucky.

"I've had a couple in office buildings, which is usually a bit of a surprise. I've had one on the top of a garage roller door, so when I put the door down it almost fell on top of me. There was one in a fire extinguisher box not long ago."

The snakes, which measured three metres and 2.4 metres, were relatively harmless carpet pythons, but still enough to scare you off going to the toilet for a little while.

snake in toilet python elliot budd

"They're considered to be harmless to people," Budd said. "They're not something to be feared, but you shouldn't go grabbing one if you don't have the training."

"The first one I got in the toilet we actually had to unbolt the toilet to get it out because he just wasn't budging," he told ABC News.

"The second one, by the time I got there most of its body was already through the pipes and so I was only really holding onto it around its neck.

"You can't pull it because you don't want to injure the snake. Eventually I loosened my grip a bit and he just started coming out on his own."

elliot budd snake catcher

According to experts, the snakes were probably searching for a damper environment due to the dry weather in the area.

"At the moment it's the snake breeding season and so males are moving around anyway and while they're moving around they'll be losing water and so they may have a special need for water now," reptile expert Professor Lin Schwarzkopf said.

"Over the next little while as it gets drier and drier - and we're not expecting much of a wet season - I expect that you may find snakes in many more wet places than you usually do."

After being removed from the toilet, the pythons were re-homed to a suitable habitat.

MORE SNAKE STORIES: