YOUNG VOICES

Ryan Wiggins, A Teen With Asperger's, Made A Film So He Could Show His Bullies What His Life Was Like

30/11/2015 12:52 GMT | Updated 30/11/2015 12:59 GMT

A teenager with Asperger's Syndrome has created a short film to highlight the torment he faces from bullying due to his condition.

Ryan Wiggins wrote, produced, and starred in the short film armed with only a selfie stick, a broken tripod, and his mum's HD video camera, before posting it on the YouTube channel Anna Kennedy Online, which he runs for the autism awareness charity.

The video, which the 14-year-old uploaded as part of National Anti-Bullying Week, has had more than 218,000 views.

Shot in black and white the video, titled Tomorrow, opens with Ryan's voice: "Will I ever know what it's like to get out of bed without feeling reluctant or stand on my own two feet without falling or stumbling? Indeed not today. Maybe tomorrow."

Later in the video Ryan, from Hertfordshire, is seen running home and collapsing in tears - when he receives a text from an unknown number telling him to go "kill yourself".

Ryan told MailOnline: "From as early as I can remember, other children seemed to want to have a dig at me. I was constantly teased at primary school, with people calling me names like 'nerdy' and 'gay'. Once one started, it wouldn't take long before others joined in.

"At worst they would push me around physically and a couple of kids threatened to beat me up in an alleyway. I tried to toughen up and deal with it but it gets unbearable after a while."

Ryan now spends much of his time supporting other young people with autism and loves drama and singing. Last year he performed "Someone Like You" by Adele for Autism's Got Talent at London's Mermaid Theatre. The event is organised by Anna Kennedy OBE, who helps raise awareness about the condition which affects an estimated 700,000 in the UK.

In May he returned to the stage as an official patron of the charity where he delivered a speech regarding his own experiences and his battle against bullies to an audience of more than 600 people.

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