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'Making A Murderer': Steven Avery Files Fresh Appeal Claiming Juror Was Out To Get Him

13/01/2016 09:53 GMT | Updated 13/01/2016 10:59 GMT

Steven Avery, the subject of the Netflix series 'Making A Murderer', has submitted a fresh appeal against his murder conviction claiming that one juror tainted the proceedings.

Avery filed the appeal after being convicted of first-degree intentional homicide in the death of photographer Teresa Halbach a decade ago.

In the filing, littered with spelling and grammatical mistakes, Avery takes issue with a search conducted during the murder investigation, saying the investigation improperly included multiple properties and therefore any evidence that was uncovered is clearly "FRUIT OF THE POISONOUS TREE".

He says the juror tainted proceedings "THROUGH DIRECT OR INDIRECT IN FLUENCE" and stated numerous times he was "F------ GUILTY."

steven avery

Steven Avery has filed an appeal

He also said Judge Angela W. Sutkiewicz made misleading statements and that his lawyers were ineffective.

Avery had been wrongfully convicted years earlier in a rape case and served 18 years in prison. He had sued Manitowoc County for tens of millions before he and his nephew, Brendan Dassey, were arrested in Halbach's death.

Manitowoc County Sheriff Robert Hermann said Tuesday he hasn't seen the appeal, but he has said in the past that the investigation was proper.

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The Associated Press attempted to contact Avery's new attorney, Kathleen Zellner, but she wasn't immediately available for comment.

The filmmakers behind "Making a Murder" cast doubt on the legal process used to convict Avery and Dassey, and their work has sparked national interest and conjecture.

Authorities involved in the case have called the 10-hour series biased. Filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, meanwhile, have stood by their work.

In the aftermath of the series, over 355,942 people signed a Change.org online protest, asking for Barack Obama to pardon the convict.

However in a statement on the We The People site, the White House said the President couldn't free Avery.

Meanwhile the only person who could allow Avery a reprieve from prison delivered some disappointing news.

Governor of Wisconsin Scott Walker, 48, vowed the 'Making A Murderer' subject would not be released from prison, despite the vast number of signatures on the petition.