Why It's Time We Stop Cosmetic Surgery Shaming

11/05/2016 12:20 | Updated 11 May 2016

I'm tired of seeing 'cosmetic surgery shaming' on daily basis in the media, why can't people get over the fact that there is nothing newsworthy in a celebrity that has had a nip or tuck or tweak?

We aren't strangers to the number of negative characteristics that are attributed with both women and men who dare to go under the knife. Although, cosmetic surgery is now more accepted than ever before, a large number of people are still willing to name-call people who have done it.

Let's look at some numbers

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), about 15.6 million cosmetic procedures were carried out in America in 2014, showing a 3% increase from 2013. This indicates that plastic surgery and cosmetic procedures are increasing rapidly all over the world, including the UK.
We can only guess that the stats have risen dramatically after the famous Kardashian-Jenner pout came into play.

Sometimes they have to do it

While you may be able to tell whether someone has undergone a recent plastic surgery procedure, you may not be able to understand the motive behind it. Yes, vanity is a huge reason but it could also be because they felt the need for a change.
A person choosing to enhance his or lips should be accepted the same way as a person who changes his or her hair colour - the latter being more publicly welcomed. In addition, cosmetic surgery isn't a fad among the rich and famous an longer, it is now more accessible than ever and for a whole variety of reasons, some transgender people may use surgery as a means of expressing themselves better, others to simply rectify what nature forgot to give them, or for some reason in life, took away. Motivation is something we simply never pause to reflect upon, we are just too quick to judge.
The reason could also be an appreciation for art, for example, when Lady Gaga had horns under her skin, ok so they were a little freaky, I'll admit.

It's not anybody's business

The reason could be purely cosmetic, vain and shallow, but it still does not mean it's our business. Our negative opinions do nothing but fuel and ignite insecurity.

According to the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Foundation, Over 1 million people in the UK suffer body dysmorphia, and the most common age BDD commences is around 13, is there any wonder therefore, that these statistics are so high, when we are becoming a nation too used to ripping another persons looks, body, and aesthetic choices to shreds.

So let's be nice. It is not our place to determine what another person should do with his or her body. Feminism and body-positivity encourages people to do whatever they want with their bodies.

It is not body-negative

People who love the way they look may be up for some change just so they could fill in that tiny space to love themselves more. A woman may like her breasts but still wish to enhance it slightly, do we really need to read about it?, why does it sit in our national media to often under the guide of 'news'?

If surgery or cosmetic treatments make a person feel more confident and empowered, who are we to tell them that they aren't accepted? As a population that loves everything that comes from our mommas', where do we draw the line between makeup, hair removal, eyebrow shaping and fillers?

Cosmetic surgery or treatments, can potentially help people feel more positive about the way they look. The pictures you see of oversized lips, ballooned up breasts and dramatic cosmetic procedures are all out dated, but when I do see such cases reported in the national media, all I see is an excuse for the media and the nation to poke public fun and ridicule at another persons choices.
People are carrying out procedures that make them (through their eyes) look better and feel more confident - not the other way around.

I think happiness is a never ending, life long pursuit, and for many people, a positive personal image is part of that, I have no issues with the journey you take in the quest of that objective, as long as you arrive at that destination safely, of course.