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Chloe Tear

Psychology student | Life as a Cerebral Palsy student blog | CP Teens UK Assistant Coordinator

I am currently 19 years old, studying Psychology & Child Development at university. At the age of 15 years old I got into blogging and created 'Life as a Cerebral Palsy Student'. I have mild Cerebral Palsy which affects the left side of my body as a result of being born 8 weeks early and weighing 3lb 3oz, as well as having seizures, chronic pain and impaired vision. I have found that blogging about my own experiences and raising disability awareness is a big part of my life that I throughly enjoy.

As my blog has progressed over the years I have loved the chance to get involved with other organisations and expand the audience of my work. One of the organisations that I work very closely with is called CP Teens UK, who are a charity for young people with Cerebral Palsy or a similar physical disability. Last year I was fortunate enough to become their Assistant Coordinator and Ambassador Programme Lead.

This Is How I See

Did you know that there are more than two million people in the UK who are affected by sight loss? I just happen to be one of those people. I am 19 years old and a student at university. During my free time I love photography, going out with friends, anything that is vintage, and writing. In general, it isn't too different to every other 19-year-old!
16/10/2017 10:32 BST

A Letter To My Newly Diagnosed Self

<img alt="everybody banner" src="http://i.huffpost.com/gen/5399116/original.jpg" width="300" height="35" /> You're currently seven years old and are about to embark on a journey of a lifetime. This journey will show you the world in a completely new light, it will show you things you never thought you would see, and allow you to meet people you might otherwise have never met.
28/08/2017 20:30 BST

Observations From A Part-Time Wheelchair User

<img alt="everybody banner" src="http://i.huffpost.com/gen/5399116/original.jpg" width="300" height="35" /> I am a part-time wheelchair user, this means that one day I can use my chair, and the next I can be walking with my stick. Being able to use a wheelchair on a part-time basis allows me to managed my energy levels and reduce pain, allowing me to function more effectively in everyday life. I am exactly the same person whether I use my stick or my chair, so why does the behaviour of others sometimes change?
14/08/2017 16:37 BST